French Criminal Justice: A Comparative Account of the Investigation and Prosecution of Crime in France

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Hart, 2005 - Law - 281 pages
Basing much of its analysis upon the first major empirical study of the French pre-trial process, this monograph breaks new ground in the field of comparative criminology. Moving away from idealized accounts of judicially supervised investigations, it provides a better understanding of the ways in which an inquisitorially rooted criminal process operates in practice and the factors that influence and constrain its development and functioning. The structure and operation of French criminal justice is set within a broad range of contextsâ??political, occupational and legal culturesâ??from the French Republican tradition of state-centered models of authority, across the growing influence of the ECHR, to the local conditions which determine the ways in which individual discretion is exercised. The French model of investigative supervision and accountability is contrasted with more adversarial procedures and in particular, the different ways in which the reliability of evidence is guaranteed and the interests of the accused protected.

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About the author (2005)

Jacqueline Hodgson is Professor of Law and Director of the Criminal Justice Centre in the School of Law, University of Warwick.

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