French Cathedrals, Monasteries and Abbeys: And Sacred Sites of France

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Century Company, 1909 - Cathedrals - 424 pages
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Page 349 - It is late — fully developed flamboyant, just past the fifteenth century — and has some Flemish stolidity mixed with the playing French fire of it ; but wood-carving was the Picard's joy from his youth up, and, so far as I know, there is nothing else so beautiful cut out of the goodly trees of the world. Sweet and young grained wood it is : oak trained and chosen for such work, sound now as 400 years since.
Page 83 - Scarcely any politics, at a moment when every bosom ought to beat with none but political sensations. The ignorance or the stupidity of these people must be absolutely incredible; not a week passes without their country abounding with events that are analyzed and debated by the carpenters and blacksmiths of England. The...
Page 259 - Renaissance in the end of the twelfth and the beginning of the thirteenth century...
Page 349 - Picardy, give it wholly to the cathedral choir. Aisles and porches, lancet windows and roses, you can see elsewhere as well as here — but such carpenter's work you cannot. It is late...
Page 369 - ... Galahad. The architecture of the tomb is exceedingly graceful and the subordinate figures admirable, but the image of the dead Duke is altogether a masterpiece. The other evening, in the solemn stillness and the fading light of the great cathedral, it seemed irresistibly human and touching. The spectator felt a sort of impulse to smooth out the shroud and straighten the helpless hands.
Page 134 - ... century has no style of its own amidst its wide knowledge of the styles of other centuries. From this lack and this gain arose in men's minds the strange idea of the Restoration of ancient buildings: and...
Page 357 - ... tower, or spire, or apse, or dome, for it will be as noisy and obtrusive under the spires of Chartres or the towers of Rouen, as it is [under] Versailles or the Dome of the Invalides ; verily railways are ABOMINATIONS ; and I think I have never fairly realised this fact till this our tour : fancy, Crom, all the roads (or nearly all) that come into Rouen dip down into the valley where it lies, from gorgeous hills which command the most splendid views of Rouen, but we, coming into Rouen by railway,...
Page xxiv - ... the only witnesses, perhaps that remain to us of the faith and fear of nations.
Page 349 - Aisles and porches, lancet windows and roses, you can see elsewhere as well as here — but such carpenter's work, you cannot. It is late, — fully developed flamboyant just past the fifteenth century — and has some Flemish stolidity mixed with the playing French fire of it ; but wood-carving was the Picard's joy from his youth up, and, so far as I know, there is nothing else so beautiful cut out of the goodly trees of the world.
Page 265 - ... with age, splendid in beauty, silent and serene, above the noise and bustle and stir of the market-place.

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