French Elements in Middle English: Chapters Illustrative of the Origin and Growth of Romance Influence on the Phrasal Power of Standard English in Its Formative Period

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Page 9 - If we want to describe the transition from the Saxon state-language of the eleventh century to the Court-English of the fourteenth, and to reduce the description to its simplest terms, it comes in fact just to this : That a French family settled in England, and edited the English language.
Page 9 - Sykes 7 sucht uns ein treues bild von "the transition from the Saxon state language of the eleventh century to the CourtEnglish of the fourteenth" zu geben , indem er sagt : "The homely English family went to school to French masters, assimilated to modes of thought and forms of expression of a new civilization, and then, and by reason of that assimilated culture, made good its right, even as an English family, to enter into the literary and social life of the new time.
Page 36 - Que vos aves ases vitaille. Ne quit devant set ans vos faille. Que vos iroie ge disant? A dame deu toz vos conmant 1125 Qui me rameint si con je vueil.
Page 31 - for al thy worthynes, For al thy beaute, and thy gentiles, For alle thy songes, and thy menstralcie, For al thy waytyng, blered is thin ye, With oon of litel reputacioun, Nought worth to the as in comparisoun The mountauns of a gnat, so mot I thrive ; For on thy bed thy wif I saugh him swyve.
Page 23 - Of my synnys till savit be, To travell apon Goddis fayis. And sen he now me till hym tais, That the body may on na viß Fulfill that the hert can deviß, I wald the hert war thiddir sent, Quharin consavit wes that entent.
Page 59 - For jow, schir, will I blithly mak This travell, gif God will me gif Laser and space so lange till liff." The kyng hym thankit tendirly; Thar wes nane in that cumpany That thai ne wepit for pite; Thair cher anoyus wes to se.
Page 12 - ... matere, 190 For-why this folk wol comen up anon, That han the lettre red ; lo, I hem here, But I conjure the, Cryseyde, and oon And two, thou, Troylus, wan thou maist gon, That at myn hous ye ben at my warnynge, For I ful wele shal shape youre comynge. " And eseth there youre hertes right ynogh, And, lat se, which of you shal bere the belle To speke of love aright ? " (therwith he lough,) " For ther have ye a leyser for to telle.
Page 64 - His four principal conclusions are: 1. That a great factor in the changes which distinguish ME. from OE. is found to be the influence of OF. 2. From the chronology of the changes it is made manifest that there is a law in the time of their appearance. 3. These changes are in essential respects in effective strength before the time of Chaucer and Wycliffe. 4. These changes, as respects chronology, are parallel with the growth of the French elements in the vocabulary of ME. On account of its method,...
Page 13 - jointes paumes, Que cis las dolereus Guillaumes, « Qui si bien s'est vers moi portés, Soit secorus et « confortés. » (Flore et Blancheflor, v. 10695.) — « Laquelle femme s'est portée très desordence
Page 64 - ... in the changes which distinguish ME. from OE. is found to be the influence of OF. 2. From the chronology of the changes it is made manifest that there is a law in the time of their appearance. 3. These changes are in essential respects in effective strength before the time of Chaucer and Wycliffe. 4. These changes, as respects chronology, are parallel with the growth of the French elements in the vocabulary of ME. On account of its method, and of the previous neglect of this important field,...

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