Fresh Wounds: Early Narratives of Holocaust Survival

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Donald L. Niewyk
Univ of North Carolina Press, 1998 - History - 414 pages
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Every student of the Holocaust knows the crucial importance of survivors' testimonies in reconstructing the crime. Most such accounts, however, were recorded years or even decades after the end of World War II. The survivor narratives that make up this vo
 

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Contents

IV
25
V
27
VI
47
VII
57
VIII
71
IX
81
X
87
XI
94
XXVIII
234
XXIX
241
XXX
243
XXXI
255
XXXII
257
XXXIII
268
XXXIV
273
XXXV
289

XII
108
XIII
118
XIV
126
XV
138
XVI
151
XVII
161
XVIII
162
XIX
165
XX
167
XXI
172
XXII
182
XXIII
187
XXIV
196
XXV
204
XXVI
215
XXVII
224
XXXVI
300
XXXVII
311
XXXVIII
313
XXXIX
323
XL
332
XLI
343
XLII
345
XLIII
354
XLIV
371
XLV
373
XLVI
390
XLVII
399
XLVIII
401
XLIX
405
L
409
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Page 2 - The greater part of the witnesses . . . have ever more blurred and stylized memories, often, unbeknownst to them, influenced by information gained from later readings or the stories of others...
Page 6 - Boder insisted on a starkly literal, verbatim rendering of the original language, searching it for evidence of what he called "deculturation" and various types of trauma. Here the objective is to let the survivors tell their stories as clearly and as intelligibly as possible, always in their own words, but with much redundant material excised and, in a few cases, the narratives reordered for chronological coherence.

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About the author (1998)

Donald L. Niewyk is professor of history at Southern Methodist University. His books include The Holocaust: Problems and Perspectives of Interpretation and The Jews in Weimar Germany.

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