Friedrich Engels and Marxian Political Economy

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Cambridge University Press, May 23, 2011 - Business & Economics
This book rejects the commonly encountered perception of Friedrich Engels as perpetuator of a 'tragic deception' of Marx, and the equally persistent body of opinion treating him as 'his master's voice'. Engels' claim to recognition is reinforced by an exceptional contribution in the 1840s to the very foundations of the Marxian enterprise, a contribution entailing not only the 'vision' but some of the building blocks in the working out of that vision. Subsequently, he proved himself to be a sophisticated interpreter of the doctrine of historical materialism and an important contributor in his own right. This volume serves as a companion to Samuel Hollander's The Economics of Karl Marx (Cambridge University Press, 2008).
 

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Contents

Engelss Early Contribution
25
The SurplusValue Doctrine Rodbertuss Charge of Plagiarism
87
Economic Organization and the Price Mechanism
125
Constitutional Reform versus Revolution
176
Social Reform
229
The EngelsMarx Relation
279
A Methodological Overview
314
The Immediate Legacy
341
Engels and Kautsky
352
Chapter 5
359
Chapter 7
368
Index
393
357
400
173
401
368
407
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Samuel Hollander is University Professor Emeritus at the University of Toronto, Canada, where he served on the faculty from 1963 to 1998, and is currently affiliated with the Department of Economics at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel. An Officer of the Order of Canada and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, Professor Hollander holds an honorary Doctorate of Law from McMaster University, Ontario, Canada, and was a Research Director at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France from 1999 to 2000. A leading historian of economic thought, his major books have been devoted to studies of Adam Smith, David Ricardo, John Stuart Mill, Thomas Robert Malthus, Jean-Baptiste Say and Karl Marx.