Friends of the Court: The Privileging of Interest Group Litigants in Canada

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SUNY Press, Mar 28, 2002 - Law - 161 pages
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In the first book-length study of interest group litigation in Canada, Friends of the Court traces the Canadian Supreme Court’s ever-changing relationship with interest groups since the 1970s. After explaining how the Court was pressured to welcome more interest groups in the late 1980s, Brodie introduces a new theory of political status describing how the Court privileges certain groups over others. By uncovering the role of the state in encouraging and facilitating litigation, this book challenges the idea that interest group litigation in Canada is a grassroots phenomenon.
 

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Contents

The Political Disadvantage Theory
1
Interveners at the Supreme Court of Canada
17
Interest Group Litigation and Judicial Supremacy
49
The Market for Section 15 Status
75
Political Disadvantage and State Action
99
POSTSCRIPT AND CONCLUSION
123
NOTES
129
REFERENCES
139
INDEX
159
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About the author (2002)

Ian Brodie is Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Western Ontario.

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