From Far and Wide: A Complete History of Canada's Arctic Sovereignty

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Dundurn, 2011 - History - 312 pages
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Is the Canadian North a state of mind or simply the lands and waters above the 60th parallel? In searching for the ill-fated Franklin Expedition in the 19th century, Britain's Royal Navy mapped and charted most of the Arctic Archipelago. In 1874 Canadian Prime Minister Alexander Mackenzie agreed to take up sovereignty of all the Arctic, if only to keep the United States and Tsarist Russia out. But as the dominion expanded east and west, the ?North” was forgotten. Besides a few industries, its potential was unknown. It was as one Canadian said ?for later.”

There wasn't much need to send police or military expeditions to the North. Not only was there little tribal warfare between the Inuit or First Nations, but there were few white settlers to protect and the ?forts” were mainly trading posts. Thus, in the early 20th century, Canada's Arctic was less known than Sudan or South Africa.

From Far and Wide recounts exclusively the historic activities of the Canadian military in Canada's North.

 

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Contents

Introduction
9
1
15
2
54
3
104
4
134
5
181
6
237
Photo Inserts
287
Notes
288
Bibliography
298
Index
300
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Peter Pigott is the author of more than 15 previous books, including Sailing Seven Seas and the bestselling Canada in Afghanistan. A well-known aviation writer, he has also published Wings Across Canada and Wingwalkers. He lives in Ottawa.

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