From Learning Theory to Connectionist Theory, Volume 2

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Psychology Press, 1992 - Psychology - 322 pages
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These two volumes consist of chapters written by students and colleagues of W.K. Estes. The books' contributors -- themselves eminent figures in the field -- reflect on Estes' sweeping contributions to mathematical as well as cognitive and experimental psychology. As indicated by their titles, Volume I features mathematical and theoretical essays, and Volume II presents cognitive and experimental essays. Both volumes contain insightful literature reviews as well as descriptions of exciting new theoretical and empirical advances. Many of the essays also incorporate personal reminiscences reflecting the authors' fond affection for their illustrious mentor.

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A New Theory of Disuse and an Old Theory of
A Retrospective and Prospective
The LongTerm Retention of Skills
A Review and
A Simultaneous Examination of Recency and Cuing Effects
The Role of Visible Persistence in Backward Masking
Abstraction and Selective Coding in ExemplarBased Models
From CrossCultural
Author Index

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About the author (1992)

Healy received her AB degree summa cum laude in 1968 from Vassar College and her Ph.D. in 1973 from The Rockefeller University. She was assistant professor and then associate professor at Yale University from 1973 to 1981. She joined the faculty of the University of Colorado at Boulder in 1981 as a tenured associate professor and has held the position of professor since 1984.

Stephen M. Kosslyn is Chair of the Department of Psychology and John Lindsley Professor of Psychology at Harvard University. A leading authority on the nature of visual mental imagery and visual communication, he has received numerous honors for his work in this field. His previous books include
Image and Mind, Wet Mind: The New Cognitive Neuroscience (with Koenig), and Psychology: The Brain, the Person, the World (with Rosenberg).