From Migrants to Citizens: Membership in a Changing World

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Carnegie Endowment, 2000 - Political Science - 514 pages
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Citizenship policies are changing rapidly in the face of global migration trends and the inevitable ethnic and racial diversity that follows. The debates are fierce. What should the requirements of citizenship be? How can multi-ethnic states forge a collective identity around a common set of values, beliefs and practices? What are appropriate criteria for admission and rights and duties of citizens? This book includes nine case studies that investigate immigration and citizenship in Australia, the Baltic States, Canada, the European Union, Israel, Mexico, Russia, South Africa and the United States. This complete collection of essays scrutinizes the concrete rules and policies by which states administer citizenship, and highlights similarities and differences in their policies. From Migrants to Citizens, the only comprehensive guide to citizenship policies in these liberal-democratic and emerging states, will be an invaluable reference for scholars in law, political science, and citizenship theory. Policymakers and government officials involved in managing citizenship policy in the United States and abroad will find this an excellent, accessible overview of the critical dilemmas that multi-ethnic societies face as a result of migration and global interdependencies at the end of the twentieth century.

 

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Contents

Introduction
25
Citizenship and Immigration in Australia
32
The Dilemmas of Canadian Citizenship Law
82
Between Principles and Politics US Citizenship Policy
119
Introduction
175
Migration and Admittance to Citizenship in Russia
178
PostApartheid Citizenship in South Africa
221
Understanding Citizenship Policy in the Baltic States
253
Nationality in Mexico
312
Citizenship in the European Union
342
Introduction
383
Citizenship and Membership in the Israeli Polity
386
Citizenship in Japan Legal Practice and Contemporary Development
434
Chapter Fifteen
475
About the Authors
501
Index
505

Introduction
304

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Page 58 - ... citizen or entitled to the rights or privileges of a subject or citizen of a foreign power; 3.

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About the author (2000)

T. Alexander Aleinikoff is senior associate with the Carnegie Endowment's International Migration Policy Program and is also a professor of law at the Georgetown University Law Center. Douglas Klusmeyer is a visiting scholar with the Migration Policicy Institute and an assistant professor in the Department of Justice, Law, and Society at American University.

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