From Slave Trade to 'Legitimate' Commerce: The Commercial Transition in Nineteenth-Century West Africa

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Robin Law
Cambridge University Press, Aug 8, 2002 - Business & Economics - 292 pages
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This edited collection, written by leading specialists, deals with nineteenth-century commercial transition in West Africa: the ending of the Atlantic slave trade and development of alternative forms of 'legitimate' trade. Approaching the subject from an African perspective, the case studies consider the effects of transition on the African societies involved, and provide new insights into the history of pre-colonial Africa and the slave trade, origins of European imperialism, and longer term issues of economic development in Africa.
 

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Contents

the impact of British
32
The West African palm oil trade in the nineteenth century
57
The compatibility of the slave and palm oil trades in Dahomey
78
the Asante response to the ending
93
Plantations and labour in the southeast Gold Coast from
119
Owners slaves and the struggle for labour in the commercial
144
Slaves Igbo women and palm oil in the nineteenth century
172
Legitimate trade and gender relations in Yorubaland
195
the Atlantic trade c 18151900
215
The New International Economic Order in the nineteenth
240
the crisis of adaptation a bibliography
265
Index
272
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