From a Native Son: Selected Essays in Indigenism, 1985-1995

Front Cover
South End Press, 1996 - History - 588 pages
0 Reviews
This disturbing and compelling work contains illuminating insights and provides a much-needed antidote to pervasive ignorance on Native American issues. In its scope and courage, From a Native Son never fails to startle with the impact of quiet truths passionately felt and powerfully expressed.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

A Survey of Native North America
21
Struggles for American Indian
37
The NavajoHopi Land Dispute
107
The Political Economy
147
The Making of an American Indian
191
Confessions of
231
The Intellectual Imperialism of U S Higher
271
LITERATURE AND THE COLONIZATION OF AMERICAN
295
The Rise of the Plastic Medicine
355
Categories
409
An Indigenist
423
The Issue of Sports
439
A Barrier
455
Jimmie Durham an Artist for Native
483
Simon J Ortizs From Sand
501
WORKS BY AUTHOR 19801996
547

Colonialism and
315
Jerry Manders In the Absence
337

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1996)

A committed radical historian and activist, Howard Zinn approaches the study of the past from the point of view of those whom he feels have been exploited by the powerful. Zinn was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1922. After working in local shipyards during his teens, he joined the U.S. Army Air Force, where he saw combat as a bombardier in World War II. He received a Ph.D. in history from Columbia University in 1958 and was a postdoctoral fellow in East Asian studies at Harvard University. While teaching at Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia, Zinn joined the civil rights movement and wrote The Southern Mystique (1964) and SNCC: The New Abolitionists (1964). He also became an outspoken critic of the Vietnam War, writing Vietnam: The Logic of Withdrawal (1967) and visiting Hanoi to receive the first American prisoners released by the North Vietnamese. Zinn's best-known and most-praised work, as well as his most controversial, is A People's History of the United States (1980). It explores American history under the thesis that most historians have favored those in power, leaving another story untold. Zinn discusses such topics as Native American views of Columbus and the socialist and anarchist opposition to World War I in examining his theory that historical change is most often due to "mass movements of ordinary people." Zinn's other books include You Can't Be Neutral on a Moving Train: A Personal History of Our Times (1995) and Artists in Times of War (2004). He has also written the plays Emma (1976), Daughter of Venus (1985), and Marx in Soho (1999).

Bibliographic information