From the Ashes of Disgrace: A Journal from Germany, 1945-1955

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Univ of Massachusetts Press, 1985 - History - 336 pages
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A thoughtful and civilized firsthand document of Germany's first phase of resurrection.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Letters
15
1945 Arrival in London Karl Mannheim
17
Frankfurt Bad Homburg
18
Search Karl Hofer Chaos
24
Waiting
29
The Mills of Death
30
Contrasts
33
Weekend at the Mosel
134
German Political Attitudes Soviet Strategy in World War III
139
The Importance of the Third World
146
Military Critic of Rearmament
149
Opinions about Ernst Reuter
159
A German Postwar Boy
169
Kurt von Tippelskirch a Historian
171
Anxiety about the Russians
179

Mannheim and Heidelberg
34
Karl Jaspers
35
1979 Postscript on Inner Emigration
40
Dolf Sternberger
41
Opening of the War Crimes Trial
43
Thanksgiving and a Personal Note
44
Salzburg Linz Vienna
45
Return to Munich
49
Max Graf zu Solms and Rudolf Bultmann
50
1946
55
Paris Frankfurt Berlin
58
American Party and German Hunger
60
Lucius D Clay Munich Nuremberg Luxury in Vienna
62
19501955
66
Old Friends the French and Pastor Niemoller
68
Paris and Wiesbaden
69
Heidelberg Revisited November 1951
71
Melville in Germany
72
Recollections 19471948 Report 1950
75
Preface
77
Three Recollections
82
Escape from Berlin 1948
86
Easter 1948 at Chiem Lake
88
Report of Visit in 1950
90
Conversations and Observations 19511952
107
Preface
109
Military Pride and Pensions
111
A Candid Soldier
113
Former Nazis in the German Foreign Office
116
A Young German Painter
117
Amateur Machiavellianism and Erich Mende
119
Changing German Behavior toward Americans
122
Impressions of Public Life
123
A Sunday Dinner
125
A Family of Former Nazis
126
Evening at a Publishers House and the Next Morning
130
On Anxiety about Attacks from the Air
180
A Panel Discussion
181
Soldier Scholar and Educator
185
Max Horkheimer and Frederick Pollock
190
The Committee of Free Jurists
193
The Socialists and Rearmament
196
Director of the German CIA
202
Observations and Conversations 19541955
211
Preface
213
Socializing with Businessmen
215
Afterthought on Malicious Joy
217
Tax Evasions
218
German Television
223
Sense of Duty
224
A Study of German Youth
225
Wilhelm Meinberg A NeoNazi
226
Military SelfCriticism the Middle East and World War III
231
France and EDC History of the German Officers Corps
234
New Look and China
238
Democracy in Germany
239
Neutralist
240
AntiAmericanism Writing between the Lines
244
Writing under Threats of Persecution German Overtures to the East The Danger of Renazification
245
GermanFrench Relations
250
Political and Military Views
252
Observations on Informal Communications and the Blank Office
267
Adelbert Weinstein and Karl Heinrich Helfer
269
The Committee for European Security of the German Bundestag
276
German Reactions to Adenauers Meeting with Khrushchev
284
Franz Josef Strauss
288
A Young Official in the Defense Ministry
293
The Spirit of the German Army
297
UpperClass Juste Milieu
302
West Germany in 1955
305
Index
309
Copyright

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Page 5 - He talked for an hour, but aimlessly,' Murphy reports in his memoirs. 'Roosevelt scarcely mentioned the Russians; the Germans were on his mind. He reminisced about his visits to Germany during his student days, and told how arrogant some Germans had been in their uniforms. He said the important thing was to keep the Germans out of uniform because 'the uniform does something bad to them, especially to the young men.
Page 5 - Proconsuls, ed. Robert Wolfe, p. 224. 31 Junker, "Franklin D. Roosevelt und das nationalsozialistische Deutschland", Deutschland und die USA, hg. Detlef Junker, p. 52. Eine ähnliche Schilderung findet man in den Memoiren Robert Murphys, wie Hans Speier berichtet: "Before Robert Murphy was sent to Germany to assume the highest political office there, Roosevelt saw him at dinner but was too ill to give Murphy any instructions. 'He talked for an hour, but aimlessly,' Murphy reports in his memoirs.
Page 8 - Formerly a banker, he was sent to the World Economic Conference as financial adviser to the United States Delegation. He was Deputy Director of the Overseas Branch of the Office of War Information during World War II. Since then, he has traveled widely abroad as a special correspondent.

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