From the Cult of Waste to the Trash Heap of History: The Politics of Waste in Socialist and Postsocialist Hungary

Front Cover
Indiana University Press, Apr 4, 2007 - Business & Economics - 264 pages

Zsuzsa Gille combines social history, cultural analysis, and environmental sociology to advance a long overdue social theory of waste in this study of waste management, Hungarian state socialism, and post--Cold War capitalism. From 1948 to the end of the Soviet period, Hungary developed a cult of waste that valued reuse and recycling. With privatization the old environmentally beneficial, though not flawless, waste regime was eliminated, and dumping and waste incineration were again promoted. Gille's analysis focuses on the struggle between a Budapest-based chemical company and the small rural village that became its toxic dump site.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

1 Was State Socialism Wasteful?
1
2 Toward a Social Theory of Waste
11
3 Metallic Socialism
41
4 The Primitive Accumulation of Waste in Metallic Socialism
79
5 The Efficiency Model
105
6 The Limits of Efficiency
125
7 The Chemical Model
145
The Wastelands of the New Europe
168
9 Conclusion
203
Notes
215
Sources and References
225
Index
247
Back cover
253
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 229 - WASTE IN INDUSTRY By the Committee on Elimination of Waste in Industry of the Federated American Engineering Societies, with a Foreword by Herbert Hoover.

About the author (2007)

Zsuzsa Gille grew up in socialist Hungary and was active in semi-legal environmental and peace movements. She is Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Bibliographic information