From the Stage Coach to the Railroad Train and the Street Car: An Outline Review Written with Special Reference to Public Conveyances in and Around Boston in the Nineteenth Century

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W. B. Clarke Company, 1900 - Transportation - 32 pages
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Page 33 - That at this rate they have conveyed upwards of fourteen passengers. 3. That their weight, including engine, fuel, water, and attendants, may be under three tons. 4. That they can ascend and descend hills of considerable inclination with facility and safety, 5. That they are perfectly safe for passengers.
Page 33 - That they will become a speedier and cheaper mode of conveyance than carriages drawn by horses. 8. " That, as they admit of greater breadth of tire than other carriages, and as the roads are not acted on so injuriously as by the feet of horses in common draught, such carriages will cause less wear of roads than coaches drawn by horses. 9. " That rates of toll have been imposed on steamcarriages, which would prohibit their being used on several lines of road, were such charges permitted to remain...
Page 33 - That they can ascend and descend hills of considerable inclination with facility and ease. 5. That they are perfectly safe for passengers. 6. That they are not (or need not be if properly constructed) nuisances to the public. 7. That they will become a speedier and cheaper mode of conveyance than carriages drawn by horses.
Page 11 - That a toll be, and hereby is granted and established for the sole benefit of said corporation, upon all passengers and property of all descriptions, which may be conveyed or transported upon said road, at such rates as may be agreed upon and established, from time to time, by the directors of said corporation.
Page 11 - The transportation of persons and property, the construction of wheels, the form of cars and carriages, the weight of loads, and all other matters and things in relation to the use of said road, shall be in conformity to such rules, regulations and provisions, as the directors shall from time to time prescribe and direct, and said road may be used by any persons who shall comply with such rules and regulations...
Page 11 - And be it further enacted. That a toll be and hereby is granted and established for the sole benefit of said corporation upon all passengers and property...
Page 33 - That carriages can be propelled by steam on common roads at an average rate of ten miles per hour. "2. That at this rate they have conveyed upwards of fourteen passengers.
Page 5 - On this occasion Mr. Quincy and Judge Story travelled only in the day time, and reached New York on the fourth day in time for a late dinner. He adds: "It need not be said that we congratulated ourselves upon living in the days of rapid communications and looked with commiseration upon the conditions of our fathers, who were wont to consume a whole week in travelling between the cities." Mr. Quincy and Judge Story made a remarkably quick trip from New York to Philadelphia, because there was an opposition...

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