From the Unconscious to the Conscious

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William Collins Sons, 1920 - Consciousness - 328 pages
 

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Contents

I
ix
II
1
III
3
IV
9
V
18
VI
23
VII
27
VIII
29
XIX
144
XX
157
XXI
161
XXII
188
XXIII
201
XXIV
209
XXV
211
XXVI
221

IX
32
X
35
XI
40
XII
51
XIII
74
XIV
84
XV
95
XVI
102
XVII
122
XVIII
139
XXVII
228
XXVIII
242
XXIX
273
XXX
275
XXXI
284
XXXII
289
XXXIII
291
XXXIV
299
XXXV
314
XXXVI
323

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Page 205 - The thought of this blank form of existence which, explored in all directions as far as imagination can reach, has, beyond that, an unexplored region compared with which the part which imagination has traversed is but infinitesimal, — the thought of a Space compared with which our immeasurable sidereal system dwindles to a point is a thought too overwhelming to be dwelt upon. Of late years the consciousness that without origin or cause infinite Space has ever existed and must ever exist, produces...
Page 14 - Many of the animal functions are known to be physical and chemical, and if there be any one which appears to be less explicable by reference to these forces than the others, it is that of nutrition. Probably in this instance force has been so metamorphosed through the influence of the originative or conscious force in evolution, that it is a distinct species in the category of forces. Assuming it to be such, I have given it the name of Bathmism (Method of Creation, 1871, p.
Page 204 - And then comes the thought of this universal matrix itself, anteceding alike creation or evolution, whichever be assumed, and infinitely transcending both, alike in extent and duration ; since both, if conceived at all, must be conceived as having had beginnings, while Space had no beginning. The thought of this blank form of existence which, explored in all directions as far as imagination can reach, has, beyond that, an unexplored region compared with which the part which imagination has traversed...
Page 54 - ... hour. Sometimes it is wanting, and it occasionally happens that no other manifestation follows. The substance itself emanates from the whole body of the medium, but especially from the natural orifices and the extremities, from the top of the head, from the breasts, and the tips of the fingers. The most usual origin, which is most easily observed, is that from the mouth. We then see the substance externalizing itself from the inner surface of the cheeks, from the gums, and from the roof of the...
Page 169 - The cardinal error which, from Aristotle onwards, has vitiated most of the philosophies of nature, is to see in vegetative, instinctive and rational life, three successive degrees of the development of one and the same tendency, whereas they are three divergent directions of an activity that has split up as it grew.
Page 67 - Thus the formations materialised in mediumistic stances arise from the same biological process as normal birth. They are neither more nor less miraculous or supernormal; they are equally so. The same ideoplastic miracle makes the hands, the face, the viscera, the tissues, and the entire organism of the foetus at the expense of the maternal body, or the hands, the face, or the entire organs of a materialisation. This singular analogy between normal and so-called supernormal physiology extends even...
Page 136 - It may be affirmed without reserve that there is in the living being a dynamo-psychism constituting the essence of the Self, which absolutely cannot be referred to the functioning of the nervous centres. This essential dynamo-psychism is not conditioned by the organism; on the contrary everything happens as though the organism and the cerebral functions were, conditioned by it.
Page 340 - Dostoevsky is an extremely able book, and Mr Lavrin attacks his subject from a different point of view to that which we are accustomed to in this country. He was educated partly in Russia and while still a University student was for two years editor of a Russian literary and political monthly, Slavansky Mir (Slavonic World). He was subsequently on the staff of the biggest Russian newspaper, Novoe Vremya. His contributions to that paper written from Albania and Serbia during the first two years of...
Page 158 - ... it would embrace in the same formula the movements of the greatest bodies in the universe and those of the lightest atom; for it, nothing would be uncertain and the future, as the past, would be present to its eyes.
Page 172 - If the consciousness that slumbers in it should awake, if it were wound up into knowledge instead of being wound off into action, if we could ask and it could reply, it would give up to us the most intimate secrets of life.

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