Fundamentals of Cancer Prevention

Front Cover
David Alberts, Lisa M. Hess
Springer Science & Business Media, Sep 24, 2008 - Medical - 536 pages
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An authoritative work that provides a detailed review of the current status of cancer prevention and control practice and research. This volume is an essential reference guide and tool for primary care physicians, the research community and students.

Written as a collaborative work by the faculty of the nationally renowned Cancer Prevention and Control Program at the Arizona Cancer Center, this book brings together the expertise of specialists in the field of cancer prevention and control to provide the medical and research community that does not specialize in this field with insight to the disciplines of cancer prevention and control.

 

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Contents

1010 Summary
233
References
234
Skin Cancer Prevention M LluriaPrevatt DS Alberts
238
112 Risk Factors
241
1122 Other Risk Factors
242
1123 Genetic Alterations in NMSC
243
1124 Genetic Alterations in Melanoma
244
113 Screening and Early Detection
245

Assessing Human and Economic Benefits of Cancer Prevention SJ Coans BM Craig
13
22 Humanistic Outcomes
14
23 Measuring HealthRelated Quality of Life and Other PatientReported Outcomes
15
231 Specific Measures
16
232 Generic or General Measures
18
24 Economic Outcomes and Cancer
20
25 Defining and Measuring Economic Outcomes
21
26 Evaluative and Descriptive Analyses in Cancer Prevention
23
Conclusion
26
The Role of Diet Physical Activity and Body Composition in Cancer Prevention CA Thomas ZChen
31
Body Weight Diet and Physical Activity
32
Review of Evidence
33
The Need for Improved Study Designs
36
35 Physical Activity and Cancer Prevention
38
36 Body Weight and Body Composition and Cancer Prevention
41
37 Lifestyle and Cancer Survivorship
43
38 Body Weight and Cancer Survival
44
39 Survivorship and Diet
45
310 Physical Activity and Cancer Survivorship
47
311 Optimizing Bone Health
49
312 Mechanisms of Carcinogenesis Modified by Lifestyle Factors
53
313 Biological Mechanisms by Which Physical Activity May Reduce Cancer Risk
58
314 Advancing the Guidelines for Cancer Preventive Lifestyle
60
315 Tools for Research and Clinical Practice
62
317 Assessment of Physical Activity and Energy Expenditure
64
318 Measurement of Body Composition
66
319 Measurement of Bone Health
68
320 Conclusion
69
References
71
Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses to Cancer KT Hastings
79
42 Innate Immune Responses to Cancer
81
421 Natural Killer Cells
82
422 GammaDelta T Cells
83
423 Phagocytes
85
424 Cytokines
86
43 Adaptive Immune Response
89
432 Tumor Antigens
90
433 T Lymphocytes
95
434 B Lymphocytes
97
435 Cytokines
98
44 Immunotherapy for Cancer Prevention
101
References
102
Hereditary Risk for Cancer KS Hunt JA Ray
109
512 Tumor Suppressor Genes
110
513 Oncogenes
111
52 Epigenetic Mechanisms
112
54 Common Hereditary Cancer Syndromes
114
542 Cowden Syndrome
116
543 Li Fraumeni Syndrome
117
545 AtaxiaTelangiectasis
118
547 Familial Adenomatous Polyposis
120
549 PeutzJeghers Syndrome
121
551 Cancer Risk Assessment Models
122
552 Epidemiologic Models of Breast Cancer Risk
123
554 Informed Consent Prior to Genetic Testing
124
56 Genetic Testing
125
562 Genetic Testing for Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colon Cancer
126
563 Genetic Testing for Familial Adenomatous Polyposis
127
57 Cancer Screening Surveillance and Prophylactic Management for Hereditary Cancer Syndromes
128
572 Prevention Strategies for Hereditary Colorectal Cancer Syndromes
129
573 Prophylactic Surgery
130
58 Conclusion
131
Human Categories and Health The Power of the Concept of Ethnicity KCoe CT Palmer
136
62 Background
138
63 Race and the Failure of Attempts to Define Ethnicity
139
64 The Interactive View of Human Development
142
642 Learned and Innate
143
644 Cultural
144
65 The Interactive View of Development and Health
145
66 Identifying Ethnicity Using Proxy Measures
149
67 Ethnicity and Health
150
68 Applications to Disparity Research
152
69 Conclusion
154
References
155
Complementary and Alternative Approaches to Cancer Prevention LK Larkey H Greenlee LE MehlMad
159
71 CAM and Cancer Prevention Research
160
Foods Spices and Herbs
161
721 Curcumin
162
722 Green Tea
163
724 Ginseng
164
725 Flaxseed
165
731 Coping and Immunity
166
732 Psychological States Interventions and Cancer
167
733 Wellness
169
74 Indigenous Cultural Systems of Healing
171
741 Ayurveda
172
742 Native American Healing Traditions
173
743 Energy Medicine
174
75 Conclusions
178
References
180
Telemedicine in Cancer Prevention AM Lopez L Kreykes
190
82 Telemedicine in Cancer Care
192
83 Primary Cancer Prevention
193
833 Exercise Education
194
834 Genetic Counseling
195
835 Psychosocial Support
196
842 Cervical Cancer
197
843 Skin Cancer
198
844 Colorectal Cancer
199
845 Prostate Cancer
200
846 Telepathology
201
86 Future Directions
202
The Drug Development Process NE McKenzie
205
91 Selecting New Molecular Entities for Development as Chemopreventive Agents
206
92 Regulatory Requirements and the US Food and Drug Administration
207
93 The Investigational New Drug Application
208
94 Phases of Clinical Research
210
95 Good Clinical Practice
211
96 The New Drug Application
212
References
213
Developing Topical Prodrugs for Skin Cancer Prevention EL Jacobson H Kim M Kim GT Wondrak MK Jacobson
215
101 Strategies for Intervention
216
Preventing DNA Damage
217
Enhancing DNA Repair
221
Preventing Photoimmune Suppression
222
Enhancing the Epidermal Barrier
223
106 Innovative Agents for Skin Cancer Prevention are Needed
224
The Cornerstone of a Skin Damage Prevention Strategy
225
108 Developing a Niacin Prodrug as a Potential Skin Cancer Prevention Agent
228
109 Clinical Development of Tetradecyl Nicotinate Nia114
231
114 Prevention of Skin Cancer
246
1142 Secondary Prevention
248
1143 Targeting Precursor Lesions for Chemoprevention
249
1144 Molecular Targets for Chemoprevention Identified in UVR Signaling Pathways
251
1145 Animal Models for Studying Chemoprevention Agents
257
1146 Endpoints for Evaluating Efficacy of Chemoprevention Agents
258
1147 Potential Chemoprevention Agents for Skin Cancer
262
115 Conclusion
274
References
275
Colorectal Cancer Prevention AIsmail EGerner PLance
291
121 Epidemiology
292
122 Risk Factors
293
1223 Inflammatory Bowel Disease
294
123 Screening and Early Detection
295
1231 Fecal Occult Blood Test FOBT
296
1232 Flexible Sigmoidoscopy
297
1233 Barium Enema
299
1235 History of CRAsorCRC
300
1237 FAPand HNPCC Kindreds
301
12392 Virtual Colonoscopy
302
124 Chemoprevention
303
1242 Folate
304
1244 Calcium
305
1247 Ursodeoxycholic Acid
306
1248 Current Status of CRC Chemoprevention
307
References
308
Lung Cancer Prevention IHakim L Garland
313
1313 The Narrowing of the Gender Gap in Smoking Prevalence
314
1314 Demographic Variables and Tobacco Use
315
132 Etiology of Lung Carcinogenesis
317
133 Cell Proliferation and Lung Carcinogenesis
319
134 Apoptosis and Lung Carcinogenesis
320
136 DNA Hypermethylation and Lung Carcinogenesis
321
137 Risk Factors for Lung Cancer
322
1372 Environmental Exposures
324
1373 Family History
325
1374 Genetic Susceptibility
326
138 Screening for Early Detection
327
1382 Standard Chest XRays and Sputum Cytology
328
1384 National Early Detection Initiatives
329
139 Chemoprevention
330
1392 Dietary Supplements
332
1393 Selenium
333
1394 Tea and Derivatives
335
1310 Conclusion
336
References
337
Breast Cancer Prevention PA Thompson AT Stopeck
346
142 Etiology
348
144 Established Breast Cancer Risk Factors
351
1441 Age Gender and Breast Cancer Risk
352
1442 Family History of Breast Cancer
353
1443 Reproductive Risk Factors
355
1444 Endogenous Hormone Exposures
356
1445 Exogenous Hormone Exposures
357
145 Prior Breast Health History
359
146 Lifestyle Risk Factors
361
148 Emerging Breast Cancer Risk Factors for Patient Management
362
149 Environmental Risk Factors
363
1411 Breast Self Exam BSE and Clinical Breast Exam CBE
364
1413 Alternative Screening Modalities and Future Directions
365
1414 Primary Prevention of Breast Cancer
366
1415 Chemoprevention
367
14152 Aromatase Inhibitors
368
14153 Retinoids
371
14155 Other Agents
372
14162 Risk Assessment Models
373
1417 Conclusion
375
References
376
Prostate Cancer Prevention SStrattom FAhmann
387
152 Epidemiology and Risk Factors
389
153 Risk Factors
390
154 Screening
393
155 Molecular Markers of Prostate Carcinogenesis
394
156 Prevention Strategies
401
1562 Selenium and Vitamin E
402
1563 Soy Isoflavones
405
1564 Cox2 Inhibitors
407
1565 Milk Thistle
408
1566 Saw Palmetto
409
1567 Resveratrol
410
References
413
Cervical Cancer Prevention F Garcia T Nuno AL Mitchell
422
162 Etiology of Cervical Cancer
424
163 Natural History of Cervical Cancer
425
164 CoFactors for Cervical Cancer
427
165 Viral Persistence
428
166 Screening and Early Detection of Cervical Cancer
429
1662 HPV Testing
431
167 Therapeutic Approach to Precursor Lesions of Cervical Cancer
432
168 Novel Agents for Cervical Cancer Prevention
433
1682 Therapeutic Vaccines
434
1683 HPV Prophylactic Vaccines
435
169 Conclusion
438
Ovarian Cancer Prevention SK Chambers LM Hess
447
172 Histopathology
449
173 Risk Factors for Epithelial Ovarian Cancer
450
174 Early Detection and Prevention of Ovarian Cancer
457
175 Chemoprevention of Ovarian Cancer
462
176 Quality of Life
463
177 Conclusion
467
Endometrial Cancer Prevention F Garcia SK Chambers
474
182 Types of Endometrial Cancer
476
183 Risk Factors for Endometrial Cancer
478
184 Genetic Factors in Endometrial Cancer
483
185 Screening and Early Detection of Endometrial Cancer
486
186 Conclusion
488
Cancer Survivorship RKrouse NM Aziz
495
191 Prevalence
496
192 Survivorship as a Scientific Discipline
498
194 Smoking Cessation
499
195 Acute Effects of Treatment
500
1952 Surgery
502
196 LongTerm and Late Effects of Cancer Treatment
503
197 Generalizations
505
198 Physiologic Sequelae of Cancer and Its Treatment
507
199 Advanced Illness
514
1910 Future Directions
515
References
520
Index
529
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