Fundamentals of Library Instruction

Front Cover
American Library Association, 2012 - Education - 112 pages
1 Review
Being a great teacher is part and parcel of being a great librarian. In this book, veteran instruction services librarian McAdoo lays out the fundamentals of the discipline in easily accessible language. Succinctly covering the topic from top to bottom, he Offers an overview of the historical context of library instruction, drawing on recent research in learning theory to help the instructor choose the most effective strategies for any situation Shows readers how to assess the information needs of a given audience, how to develop a curriculum for teaching information literacy, and how to fit an appropriate amount of content into the allotted time Addresses the pros and cons of online versus face-to-face instruction Includes methods for publicizing the availability of the library's learning opportunities With expert guidance for putting theory into practice, McAdoo's book helps librarians connect with students as effectively as possible.
 

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User Review  - lincics - LibraryThing

Offers a concise overview of major topics and concepts relevant to library instruction. Most useful for those with little previous teaching experience, or those who may be developing a library instruction program for the first time. Read full review

Contents

Historical Overview of Library Instruction
1
Who Teaches?
7
How Students Learn
17
Predelivery Considerations
23
What to Teach
33
Where Instruction Takes Place
43
Its about Time
51
Characteristics of Effective Instructors
67
Characteristics of Effective Instruction
75
Assessment
83
Challenges to Instruction
99
Index
107
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Dr. Monty L. McAdoo is Instructional Services Librarian of the Baron-Forness Library at Edinboro University of Pennsylvania in Edinboro, Pennsylvania. His research interests include faculty understanding and use of information literacy and information technology. He is also interested in the philosophy of library and information science. McAdoo earned his master s degree in library science at the University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, and his doctorate of education in administration and leadership studies at Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

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