Fundamentals of Network Security

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Artech House, 2001 - Computers - 319 pages
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Network security has quickly become an area of primary concern in the world of telecommunications. This easy-to-understand book introduces professionals to fundamental network security concepts, principles, and terms, while providing practical techniques that can be applied on the job. It helps identify the best type of intrusion detection system for a particular environment, develop organizational guidelines for passwords, set general computer security policies, and perform a security review and risk assessment.
 

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Very good book for understanding information security
good writing for better understanding
Arshad
arshad.centech@gmail.com 

Selected pages

Contents

Basic Security Concepts
1
Why Is Computer and Network Security Important?
2
Background
4
History
5
The Security Trinity
8
Information Security
9
Risk Assessment
11
Security Models
12
Available Disk Space
159
File Attributes
160
Remove Inactive Accounts
163
Single SignOn
164
PolicyBased Network Management
165
Segmenting LAN Traffic
170
Static IP Addresses Versus Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol DHCP
171
Media and Protocols
173

The Perimeter Defense
13
Vulnerabilities
14
Countermeasures
16
Access Control Authorization
17
Confidentiality
18
Nonrepudiation
19
Threats Vulnerabilities and Attacks
21
The OSI Reference Model
22
TCPIP Protocol Suite
23
Threats Vulnerabilities and Attacks
25
Useful Web Sites
43
Search Engines
45
Mailing Lists
46
Encryption Digital Signatures and Certification Authorities
49
Stream Ciphers
51
Block Ciphers
52
Breaking Ciphers
53
Cryptanalysis
54
Social Engineering
55
Data Encryption Standard DES
57
Asymmetric Key Encryption
58
Public Key Cryptosystems
59
Rivest Shamir Adelman RSA
60
MD4
61
Secure Hash Algorithm1 SHA1
62
Digital Signatures
63
Competing Standards
64
Digital Certificate
65
Limitations of Digital Certificates
67
Public Key Infrastructure
69
Advanced Encryption Standard AES
70
EllipticCurve Cryptography ECC
71
Kerberos Key Exchange
73
Kerberos Limitations
77
Encryption on the World Wide Web
79
Secure Sockets Layer
80
Secure HTTPSHTTP
82
Microsofts Internet Explorer
84
Netscape Navigator
91
Authenticode Certificates
94
Downloading a Program With an Invalid Certificate
97
EMail
99
EMail Issues
100
Secure EMail Protocols
102
WebBased EMail Services
115
Security of Stored Messages
117
Spoofing and Hiding
118
EMail as a Weapon
120
Policies
123
EMail Privacy
125
AutoResponses
127
Operating System Security
129
Passwords
133
Password Guidelines
139
Access Control
141
General Recommendations
146
Modems
149
Useful Tools
153
LAN Security
157
Concurrent Logins
158
Wireless
177
Wireless WAN
178
Plenum Cabling and Risers
179
WANs
182
Dedicated Lease Lines
183
Cable Television
187
x Digital Subscriber Line xDSL
188
The Internet
189
Redundancy and Alternative Connections
190
Routers and SNMP
191
Risks
192
Cisco Secure Integrated Software SIS
194
Simple Network Management Protocol SNMP
195
Virtual Private Networks
201
EndtoEnd Encryption
202
Where to Encrypt
203
Virtual Private Networks VPNs
205
L2TP
206
SOCKS
207
Implementation
208
Firewalls
211
Firewalls Pros
212
Types of Firewalls
214
Firewall Configurations
216
Restricting Users Access to the Internet
222
Firewall Products
223
Firewall Alternatives
224
Personal Firewalls
226
Biometrics
231
Biometric Identification and Authentication
232
Policies and Procedures
239
Policy and Procedure Manuals
245
Security Policy Suggestions
247
Use of CompanyOwned Electronic Media and Services
249
Information Privacy
253
Information and Data Management
254
Systems Administration
255
Remote Network Access
256
Use of Standards
257
Information Protection Team
259
Auditing Monitoring and Intrusion Detection
261
What Is an Audit?
262
Audit Mistakes
266
Deficiencies of Traditional Audit Techniques
268
Intrusion Detection
269
Future Directions
278
Crisis Management
279
What Level of Preparation?
281
What to Restore First?
282
Disaster Recovery Planning Case Study
283
Outsourcing Plan Development and Maintenance
287
Computer Security Incident Response Plan
288
Cookies Cache and AutoComplete
293
Cookies
294
Cache Files
298
AutoComplete
303
About the Author
305
Index
307
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

John E. Canavan holds a B.S. in information systems from Quinnipiac University and a M.S. in telecommunications management from Golden Gate University. Canavan is vice president, information systems and technology at Bethpage FCU and an adjunct professor at Golden Gate University where he teaches in the Telecommunications Management program.

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