Fungal Biology

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CUP Archive, 1992 - Medical - 306 pages
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First published by Cambridge University Press in 1991, this book introduces fungi to readers from an ecological viewpoint, emphasising the ecological diversity and extreme versatility of the fungi. The introductory chapter covers fungal structure, growth and reproduction. The remaining chapters consider the fungi in their ecological roles, for example as decomposers of leaves, inhabitants of aquatic environments and as mutualistic symbionts in mycorrhiza and with insects. The intention is to treat fungi in terms of their adaptations to the ecosystems that they occupy. Although fungi as soil inhabitants are not included, much of their ecological significance is considered elsewhere, for example in the chapters on fungi as decomposers of leaves and wood. Examples given are worldwide, including from tropical countries, and the book is well illustrated with many original illustrations drawn from living material.
 

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Contents

Preface
1
Fungi as decomposers of leaves
57
Exochthonous fungi
64
Distribution of the common primary saprotrophs
70
Decomposition of pine needles
77
Fungi as decomposers of wood
84
Natural resistance of wood to fungal decay
93
Environmental factors and the decomposition of wood
99
Fungi as inhabitants of extreme environments
159
Fungi as mutualistic symbionts in ectomycorrhizas and lichens
183
Fungi as mutualistic symbionts in endomycorrhizas
214
Benefits to fungus
225
Ectendomycorrhizas
231
Fungi as symbionts with insects
242
Plant galls and fungi
248
The Attine ants and their fungi
254

Decomposition of lignin and humus in the soil
106
Fungi as inhabitants of aquatic environments
110
Fungi as inhabitants of animal faeces
146
Endosymbiotic associations
263
References
285
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