Fungal Infection of Plants: Symposium of the British Mycological Society

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, 1987 - Science - 428 pages
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Infection of most species of cultivated and wild plants by fungi is a normal biological event, but one of profound importance in the exploitation of plants for food and medicine, building materials and decorative purposes. Potato Blight, Dutch Elm disease and Southern Leaf Blight are all examples of infections leading to disease and plant death, but mycorrhizal fungi confer great benefit on plants, enhancing growth and providing cross-protection agains plant pathogenic species. Originally published in 1987, this book examines infection as a phenomenon common to pathogenic and mycorrhizal fungi alike. It deals with the establishment, progress and outcome of infection and covers such important fundamental aspects as recognition and resistance and seeks to explain why some infections lead to disease while others remain symptomless and beneficial. The various chapters provide a detailed account of the different aspects of fungal infection, written by an international group of scientists.
 

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Contents

Specificity and recognition in ectomycorrhizal associa
25
endogenous and exogenous control
45
Pathways for the exchange of materials in mycoparasitic
60
Induced modifications in the plasma membranes
79
Nutrient relations in biotrophic infections
92
Some aspects of fungal enzymes that degrade cell walls
133
The role of fungal toxins in plant disease
158
Antifungal substances from herbaceous plants
193
Fruiting and successions of ectomycorrhizal fungi
253
Formation and dispersal of propagules of endogona
269
a basis for understand
285
The role of the saprophytic phase in Dutch elm disease
298
Sporulation of foliar pathogens
314
Inoculum production and survival in fungi which form
349
Genetic analysis of interactions between microbes
366
the plant fights back
383

Antimicrobial defences in secondary tissues of woody
219
Comparisons between vesiculararbuscular mycorrhizal
239

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