GMO Free: Exposing the Hazards of Biotechnology to Ensure the Integrity of Our Food Supply

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Vital Health Publishing, 2004 - Business & Economics - 133 pages
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The genetic engineering of food crops is an ecological hazard and health crisis that affects us all. Its consequences are global and potentially irrevocable. Yet the decision to use genetically modified organisms is currently being made for you by the government and major multinational corporations. To combat this practice, more than 600 scientists from 72 countries have called for a moratorium on the environmental release of GMOs. GMO Free is the most comprehensive resource available on the science behind this worldwide debate.

GMO Free takes a good look at the evidence scientists have compiled, and makes a powerful case for a worldwide ban on GMO crops, to make way for a shift to sustainable agriculture and organic farming. It's time to take the future of your food supply and environment into your own informed hands. GMO Free will give you the information you need to do so.

 

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I still think cheese is yummy.... :P

Contents

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About the author (2004)

Mae-Wan Ho, PhD, is director of the Institute of Science in Society, and Science Advisor to the Third World Network. Her career spans more than thirty years of research and teaching in biochemistry, molecular genetics, and biophysics.

Lim Li Ching works as a researcher for both the biosafety program at the Third World Network and the Institute of Science in Society. She is also the deputy editor of the magazine Science in Society.

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