Gaia, a new look at life on earth

Front Cover
Oxford University Press, 1979 - Science - 157 pages
The Gaia hypothesis, first put forth in the mid-1960s, and published in book form in 1975, explores the idea that the life of earth functions as a single organism which actually defines and maintains conditions necessary for its survival. Disclaiming the conventional belief that living matter reacts passively in the face of threats to its existence, Lovelock argues that the earth's living matter - air, ocean, and land surfaces - forms a complex system which has the capacity to keep our planet a fit place for life. Now reissued with an updated preface which discusses how Lovelock's predictions have already begun to hold true, Gaia has dramatically altered the way scientists view evolution and the environment.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - bluetyson - LibraryThing

A really interesting book, and hypothesis. I first noticed this theory, funnily enough, after watching the excellent miniseries 'Edge of Darkness' and some of the writing involved with talking about ... Read full review

Review: Gaia: A New Look at Life on Earth

User Review  - Mark - Goodreads

Interesting, but how much scientific evidence is their really to support this hypothesis? Read full review

Contents

Introductory
1
In the beginning
13
The recognition of Gaia
33
Copyright

8 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1979)

James Lovelock is an independent scientist, inventor, and author. He was elected Fellow of the Royal Society in 1974 and in 1990 was awarded the first Amsterdam Prize for the Environment by the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences. One of his inventions is the electron capture detector, which was important in the development of environmental awareness. It revealed for the first time the ubiquitous distribution of pesticide residues. He co-operated with NASA and some of his inventions were adopted in their program of planetary exploration.

Bibliographic information