Gaieties and Gravities;: A Series of Essays, Comic Tales, and Fugitive Vagaries. Now First Collected

Front Cover
Henry Colburn, 1825 - 353 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 324 - This is the excellent foppery of the world, that, when we are sick in fortune, — often the surfeit of our own behaviour, — we make guilty of our disasters the sun, the moon, and the stars...
Page 255 - Ye winds that have made me your sport, Convey to this desolate shore Some cordial endearing report Of a land I shall visit no more. My friends, do they now and then send A wish or a thought after me ? O tell me I yet have a friend, Though a friend I am never to see.
Page 257 - Ring out, ye crystal Spheres! Once bless our human ears (If ye have power to touch our senses so), And let your silver chime Move in melodious time; And let the base of Heaven's deep organ blow, And with your ninefold harmony Make up full consort to the angelic symphony.
Page 8 - Lo, the poor Indian, whose untutored mind Sees God in clouds, and hears Him in the wind...
Page 56 - Ay, but to die, and go we know not where ; To lie in cold obstruction, and to rot; This sensible warm motion to become A kneaded clod...
Page 192 - Whatever spirit, careless of his charge, His post neglects, or leaves the fair at large, Shall feel sharp vengeance soon o'ertake his sins, Be...
Page 125 - Angels and ministers of grace defend us! Be thou a spirit of health or goblin damn'd, Bring with thee airs from heaven or blasts from hell, Be thy intents wicked or charitable, Thou com'st in such a questionable shape, That I will speak to thee: I'll call thee Hamlet, King, father, royal Dane, O, answer me!
Page 81 - ... a personage of whom it might be pronounced, as Butler said of the Duke of Buckingham, that he endures pleasures with less patience than other men do their pains ? — -a staid, important, dogged, square-rigged, mathematicalminded sort of an animal? Question him, and I will lay my head to yours (for I like to take the odds), that whatever tolerance he may be brought to admit for other deviations from the right line of gravity, he will profess a truculent and implacable hatred of that most kind-hearted,...
Page 82 - Friends, Noman kills me; Noman in the hour Of sleep, oppresses me with fraudful power.' 'If no man hurt thee, but the hand divine Inflict disease, it fits thee to resign: To Jove or to thy father Neptune pray.
Page 200 - Thy two breasts are like two young roes that are twins : thy neck is as a tower of ivory. Thine eyes like the fishpools in Heshbon, by the gate of Bath-rabbim : thy nose is as the tower of Lebanon which looketh toward Damascus.

Bibliographic information