Galic Antiquities:: Consisting of a History of the Druids, Particularly of Those of Caledonia; a Dissertation on the Authenticity of the Poems of Ossian; and a Collection of Ancient Poems, Translated from the Galic ...

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Macfarquhar and Elliot, 1780 - Druids and druidism - 352 pages
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Page 119 - NOR were they only the bards of great families who were here concerned. The vaflal, equally fond of the fong with his fuperior, entertained himfelf in the fame manner ; and all, under his influence, by contributing to his amufement in this way, were fure of obtaining his favour. This, with a life free from care, a fpirit unbroken. broken by labour, and a fpace of time unoccupied by any other employment or diverfion, contributed to render the Highlanders a nation of fingers and poets. From the recital...
Page 123 - HAVING amgned fo many caufes for the prefervation of the poems of Oman, whilft thefe caufes operated; we now proceed to account for their being, in a great meafure, loft fo fuddenly. THAT we have not the whole of the poems of Oman, or even of the collection tranflated by Mr Macpherfon, we allow. Yet ftill we have many of them ; and of almoft all a part. The building is not entire ; but we have ftill the grand ruins of it.
Page 202 - Ossian is я tree that is withered ; its branches are blasted and bare ; no green leaf covers its boughs ; from its trunk no young shoot is seen to spring ; the breeze whistles in its grey moss; the blast shakes its head of age; the...
Page 32 - ... next day by a portion of the holy fire which was kindled and consecrated by the Druids. Of this, no person who had infringed the peace, or...
Page 135 - Dargo climbed the mast to look for Morven, but Morven he saw no more. The thong broke in his hand, and the waves, with all their foam, leapt over his red wandering hair. The fury of the blast drove our sails, and we lost sight of the chief. We lost sight of the chief, and bade the ghosts of his fathers convey him to his place of rest.
Page 3 - Persia, brachmans of India, and chaldees of Babylon and Assyria. Between the tenets of all these sects, in their earliest and most genuine state, there seems to have been such conformity as plainly evinces them to have all sprung from the same common root, the religion of Noah and of the antediluvians. Wherever the Celtic tribes, or posterity of Japhet migrated, they carried this religion with them, so that it was of the same extent with their dominions. According to the lowest calculations, these...
Page 224 - with Garno; why did I wound my friend ; why did I hear of Duaran ? O that Annir were near to raife the gray-ftone of my tomb ! — Bend down, my fathers, from your airy halls, to meet me !" His words were heard no more. Cold and pale in his blood he funk. ANNIR came. Trembling were her fteps : wild were her looks : diffracted were her words.
Page 191 - All this while our joy remained i our days were glad. The winter with all its fnow was warm, and the night with all its clouds was bright. The face of Minalla was a light that never knew a wane ; an undecaying beam around my fteps. But now...
Page 20 - It had its gently sloping hills of green: nor did they wholly want their clouds ; but the clouds were bright and transparent, and each involved in its bosom the source of a stream, — a beauteous stream, which, wandering down the steep, was like the faint notes of the half-touched harp to the distant ear. The valleys were open and free to the ocean; trees loaded with leaves, which scarcely waved to the light...
Page 20 - The valleys were open and free to the ocean; trees loaded with leaves, which scarcely waved to the light breeze, were scattered on the green declivities and rising grounds.

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