Galic antiquities: consisting of a history of the druids, particularly of those of Caledonia; a dissertation on the authenticity of the poems of Ossian; and a collection of ancient poems

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Printed for C. Elliot, 1780 - Druids and Druidism - 352 pages
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Page 3 - Persia, brachmans of India, and chaldees of Babylon and Assyria. Between the tenets of all these sects, in their earliest and most genuine state, there seems to have been such conformity as plainly evinces them to have all sprung from the same common root, the religion of Noah and of the antediluvians. Wherever the Celtic tribes, or posterity of Japhet migrated, they carried this religion with them, so that it was of the same extent with their dominions. According to the lowest calculations, these...
Page 199 - ... is filent. It moves not the withered leaf, if the eddying wind doth not aid it. On eddying winds let thy fpirit be borne, fon of Duino, to thy fathers ; but light let the turf lie over thy beauteous form, and calm in the grave be thy dumber...
Page 68 - M'Lauchlan of the 55th regiment. It confifted of fome poems and a theological difcourfe. From thefe obfervations and facts, it clearly appears, that ever fince the time of the Druids, the Galic has been always a written language. If this note had not already fwelled fo much, we might offer feveral arguments to fhew, that, in all probability, the Galic WHETHER the Druids were acquainted with the Greek language, is a queftion which fome have affirmed, and others denied.
Page 123 - HAVING amgned fo many caufes for the prefervation of the poems of Oman, whilft thefe caufes operated; we now proceed to account for their being, in a great meafure, loft fo fuddenly. THAT we have not the whole of the poems of Oman, or even of the collection tranflated by Mr Macpherfon, we allow. Yet ftill we have many of them ; and of almoft all a part. The building is not entire ; but we have ftill the grand ruins of it. WITHIN a century back, the Highlands of Scotland have undergone a greater revolution...
Page 202 - Again, when old and weary, blind, and almost destitute of friends, Ossian compares himself to a tree that is withered and decayed : " But Ossian is a tree that is withered ; its branches are blasted and bare ; no green leaf covers its boughs : from its trunk no young shoot is seen to spring ; the breeze whistles in its grey moss ; the blast shakes its head of age ; the storm will soon overturn it, and strew all its dry branches with thee, O Dermid, and with all the rest of the mighty dead, in the...
Page 9 - Nor was this all : for* as we mall fee in the fequel, they managed matters fo dexteroufly, that they engroffed all power, civil as well as religious ; infomuch* that no bufinefs whatever, of any moment, could be done without their concurrence. Under the character of either priefts, magiftrates, philofophers, or phyficians, they took every thing under their cognizance. This vaft authority, with the other privileges and immunities annexed to the office, rendered it an object of ambition to many of...
Page 32 - ... next day by a portion of the holy fire which was kindled and consecrated by the Druids. Of this, no person who had infringed the peace, or...
Page 135 - Dargo climbed the mast to look for Morven, but Morven he saw no more. The thong broke in his hand, and the waves, with all their foam, leapt over his red wandering hair. The fury of the blast drove our sails, and we lost sight of the chief. We lost sight of the chief, and bade the ghosts of his fathers convey him to his place of rest.
Page 198 - ... of Atha, darting on the dun trembling fawn of the defart. In battle thy path was like the rapid fall of a mountain ftream, when it pours its white torrent over the rock, and fends abroad its grey mifts upon the wings of the winds. The roar of its ftream is loud through Mora's rocks. Mountain trees, with all their mofs and earth, are fwept along between its arms : but when it reaches the calm fea of the vale, its ftrength is loft, and the noife of its courfc is filent.
Page 3 - The religion of the Druids is allowed to have been of the same antiquity with that of the magi of Persia, brachmans of India, and chaldees of Babylon and Assyria. Between the tenets of all these sects, in their earliest and most genuine state, there seems to have been such conformity as plainly evinces them to have all sprung from the same common root, the...

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