Gallegher and Other Stories

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Scribner's, 1891 - Short stories - 238 pages
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Page 44 - Cronin's while he went in to get a drink, and he took too much, and me father told me to drive it round to the stable for him. I'm Cronin's son. McGovern ain't in no condition to drive. You can see yourself how he's been misusing the horse. He puts it up at Bachman's livery stable, and I was just going around there now." Gallegher's knowledge of the local celebrities of the district confused the zealous officer of the peace. He surveyed the boy with a steady stare that would have distressed a less...
Page 19 - Gallegher," he said. He knew he had a long ride, and much rapid work before him, and he was preparing for the strain. To Gallegher the idea of going to sleep seemed almost criminal. From the dark corner of the cab his eyes shone with excitement, and with the awful joy of anticipation. He glanced every now and then to where the sporting editor's cigar shone in the darkness, and watched it as it gradually burnt more dimly and went out. The lights in the shop windows threw a broad glare across the ice...
Page 27 - ... crook or a prize-fighter. There were well-fed, well-groomed clubmen and brokers in the crowd, a politician or two, a popular comedian with his manager, amateur boxers from the athletic clubs, and quiet, close-mouthed sporting men from every city in the country. Their names if printed in the papers would have been as familiar as the types of the papers themselves. And among these men, whose only thought was of the brutal sport to come, was Hade, with Dwyer standing at ease at his shoulder, —...
Page 78 - Did you know that youse scared me so that I was going to kill you?" whispered Rags, apologetically, as he carefully held the baby from him at arm's length. "Did you?" But the baby only smiled at this and reached out its hand and stroked Rag's cheek with its fingers. There was something so wonderfully soft and sweet in this that...
Page 51 - Dwyer, sir," he began faintly, with his eyes fixed fearfully on the managing editor, "he got arrested — and I couldn't get here no sooner, 'cause they kept a-stopping me, and they took me cab from under me — but — " he pulled the notebook from his breast and held it out with its covers damp and limp from the rain, "but we got Hade, and here's Mr. Dwyer's copy." And then he asked, with a queer note in his voice, partly of dread and partly of hope, "Am I in time, sir?
Page 53 - You won't turn me off for running away, will you ? " he whispered. The managing editor did not answer immediately. His head was bent, and he was thinking, for some reason or other, of a little boy of his own, at home in bed. Then he said, quietly,
Page 39 - ... minutes before he could loosen it. But his teeth finally pulled it apart, and with the reins in his hands he sprang upon the wheel. And as he stood so, a shock of fear ran down his back like an electric current, his breath left him, and he stood immovable, gazing with wide eyes into the darkness. The officer with the lantern had suddenly loomed up from behind a carriage not fifty feet distant, and was standing perfectly still, with his lantern held over his head, peering so directly toward Gallegher...
Page 89 - The lights in the street seemed to flash up suddenly and grow dim again, leaving Rags blind and dizzy. "Stop," he yelled, "stop. Murdered, no, by God, no," he cried, staggering half-way down the stairs; "stop, stop!" But no one heard Rags, and the sound of his own voice halted him. He sank back weak and sick upon the top step of the stairs and beat his hands together upon his head. "It's a lie, it's a lie,
Page 25 - Jbut a square, with wooden posts at its four corners through which ran a heavy rope. The space inclosed by the rope was covered with sawdust. Gallegher could not resist stepping into the ring, and after stamping the sawdust once or twice, as if to assure himself that he was really there, began dancing around it, and indulging in such a remarkable series of fistic manoeuvres with an imaginary adversary that the unimaginative detective precipitately backed into a corner of the barn. " Now, then," said...
Page 4 - He wore perpetually on his face a happy and knowing smile, as if you and the world in general were not impressing him as seriously as you thought you were, and his eyes, which were very black and very bright, snapped intelligently at you like those of a little blackand-tan terrier. All Gallegher knew had been learnt on the streets ; not a very good school in itself, but one that turns out very knowing scholars. And Gallegher had attended both morning and evening sessions. He could not tell you who...

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