Gallegher: And Other Stories

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C. Scribner's Sons, 1902 - Short stories, American - 238 pages
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Page 241 - There are few living American writers who can reproduce for us more perfectly than Mr. Cable does, in his best moments, the speech, the manners, the whole social atmosphere of a remote time and a peculiar people. A delicious flavor of humor penetrates his stories, and the tragic portions are handled with rare strength.
Page 8 - I've been a doing it for two weeks now, and I can tell you it's hard work, for everybody wears gloves this kind of weather. But if you look long enough you'll find him. And when you think it's him, go up to him and hold out your hand in a friendly way, like a bunco-steerer, and shake his hand; and if you feel that his forefinger ain't real flesh, but just wadded cotton, then grip to it with your right and grab his throat with your left, and holler for help.
Page 237 - Chicago Evening Post. Miss JERRY. A Love Story. Third Edition. Mr. Howells says in a letter to the author : " You have struck boldly at life in your story and you have got a fresh note from it.
Page 238 - It stands so far above the ordinary novel of the day in respect to range of thought and method of treatment that only an extended review could show its social and ethical, as well as artistic, importance."— Boston Beacon.
Page 17 - The sporting editor reached his hand out to pat Gallegher on the head, but changed his mind and shook hands with him instead. "My boy," he said, "you are an infant phenomenon. If I can pull the rest of this thing off to-night it will mean the $5,000 reward and fame galore for you and the paper. Now, I'm going to write a note to the managing editor, and you can take it around to him and tell him what you've done and what I am going to do, and he'll take you back on the paper and raise your salary....
Page 2 - He wore perpetually on his face a happy and knowing smile, as if you and the world in general were not impressing him as seriously as you thought you were, and his eyes, which were very black and very bright, snapped intelligently at you like those of a little blackand-tan terrier. All Gallegher knew had been learnt on the streets ; not a very good school in itself, but one that turns out very knowing scholars.
Page 240 - It is written with admirable restraint, and without affectations of style, in the clearest English. It is a pleasure to •welcome Mr. Herrick into the small company of serious literary workers."— Chap Book.
Page 241 - ... is powerful and unhackneyed. The characters are drawn with exceptional clearness, and the development of the plot also is masterly."— The Congregationalist. THAT FIRST AFFAIR, and Other Sketches. Illustrated by Gibson, Frost, Richards, and the Author. I2mo, $1.25. " Delightful examples of how short stories should be written. . . . the volume is readable from cover to cover."— New York Tribune.
Page 237 - Those who know a piece of life when they find it, and who care for the ultimate charm of a bit of pure literature, will read and re-read Mr. Barrie's masterpiece."— HAMILTON W.
Page 244 - ZOLA, SOUVESTRE, DROZ, and MERIMEE. III. — BALZAC, LOTI, GAUTIER, ERCKMANN-CHATRIAN, ROD, and DE VIGNY. GERMAN. I.— HEYSE, LINDAU, SACHER-MASOCH, BAUMBACH, HOFFMAN, and ZSCHOKKE. II. — AUERBACH, KOMPERT, HAUFF, and VON CHAMISSO. SPANISH. DE ALCARC6N, SELGAS, BECQUER, and CABALLERO. RUSSIAN. TURGENIEFF, POUSHKIN, GOGOL, and TOLSTOI. SCANDINAVIAN. BJORNSON, AHO, GOLDSCHMIDT, and BREMER.

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