Gallegher: And Other Stories

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C. Scribner's Sons, 1891 - Short stories, American - 238 pages
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Page 44 - Gallegher's knowledge of the local celebrities of the district confused the zealous officer of the peace. He surveyed the boy with a steady stare that would have distressed a less skilful liar, but Gallegher only shrugged his shoulders slightly, as if from the cold, and waited with apparent indifference to what the officer would say next. In reality his heart was beating heavily against his side, and he felt that if he was kept on a strain much longer he would give way and break down. A second snow-covered...
Page 19 - The sporting editor stepped into the waiting cab, while Gallegher whispered the directions to the driver. He was told to go first to a districtmessenger office, and from there up to the Ridge Avenue Road, out Broad Street, and on to the old Eagle Inn, near Torresdale. It was a miserable night. The rain and snow were falling together, and freezing as they fell. The sporting editor got out to send his message to the Press office, and then lighting a cigar, and turning up the collar of his great-coat,...
Page 4 - He wore perpetually on his face a happy and knowing smile, as if you and the world in general were not impressing him as seriously as you thought you were, and his eyes, which were very black and very bright, snapped intelligently at you like those of a little blackand-tan terrier. All Gallegher knew had been learnt on the streets ; not a very good school in itself, but one that turns out very knowing scholars.
Page 39 - It was still there, and the horse, as he had left it, with its head turned toward the city. Gallegher opened the big gate noiselessly, and worked nervously at the hitching strap. The knot was covered with a thin coating of ice, and it was several minutes before he could loosen it. But his teeth finally pulled it apart, and with the reins in his hands he sprang upon the wheel. And as he stood so, a shock of fear ran down his back like an electric current, his breath left him, and he stood immovable,...
Page 13 - But possibilities and probabilities were to be discovered later. Now was the time for action. He was after the man in a moment, hanging at his heels and his eyes moist with excitement. He heard the man ask for a ticket to Torresdale, a little station just outside of Philadelphia, and when he was out of hearing, but not out of sight, purchased one for the same place. The stranger went into the smoking-car, and seated himself at one end toward the door. Gallegher took his place at the opposite end....
Page 96 - I'd have to hang for it, well, even then, they used to bring her to see me every day, and when they'd lift her up, and she'd reach out her hands and kiss me through the bars, why — they could have took me out and hung me, and been damned to 'em, for all I'd have cared.
Page 89 - The lights in the street seemed to flash up suddenly and grow dim again, leaving Rags blind and dizzy. "Stop," he yelled, "stop. Murdered, no, by God, no," he cried, staggering half-way down the stairs; "stop, stop!" But no one heard Rags, and the sound of his own voice halted him. He sank back weak and sick upon the top step of the stairs and beat his hands together upon his head. "It's a lie, it's a lie,
Page 95 - Heffner, the two ward detectives, as they came in from the street, looking hot, and tired, and anxious. They gave a careless glance at the group, and then stopped with a start, and one of them gave a long, low whistle. " Well," exclaimed Wade, with a gasp of surprise and relief. " So Raegen, you're here, after all, are you ? Well, you did give us a chase, you did. Who took you...
Page 70 - ... supposedly drowned man. And that after two or three futile attempts to find his own corpse, he had climbed up on the dock and told the officer that he had touched the body sticking in the mud. And, as a result of this fiction, the river-police dragged the river-bed around Wakeman's Slip with grappling-irons for four hours, while Rags sat on the wharf and directed their movements. But on this present occasion the police were standing between him and the river, and so cut off his escape in that...
Page 46 - ... look-out. He had passed it before he realized this; but the fact stirred him into wakefulness again, and when his cab's wheels slipped around the City Hall corner, he remembered to look up at the other big clockface that keeps awake over the railroad station and measures out the night. He gave a gasp of consternation when he saw that it was half-past two, and that there was but ten minutes left to him. This, and the many electric lights and the sight of the familiar pile of buildings, startled...

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