Galloway in Ancient and Modern Times

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W. Blackwood and sons, 1891 - Galloway (Scotland : Peninsula) - 324 pages
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Page 228 - Great, as he is called, about the end of the sixth, or the beginning of the seventh century...
Page 225 - In the year of our Lord, 565, when Justin, the younger, the successor of Justinian, had the government of the Roman Empire, there came into Britain a famous priest and abbot, a monk by habit and life, whose name was Columba, to preach the Word of God to the provinces of the Northern Picts, who are separated from the Southern parts by steep and rugged mountains...
Page 237 - I know a merchant man, which shall at this time be nameless, that bought the contents of two noble libraries for forty shillings price, a shame it is to be spoken.
Page 230 - IN the year of our Lord's incarnation 156, Marcus Antoninus Verus, the fourteenth from Augustus, was made emperor, together with his brother, Aurelius Commodus. In their time, whilst Eleutherus, a holy man, presided over the Roman church, Lucius, king of the Britons, sent a letter to him, entreating that by his command he might be made a Christian. He soon obtained his pious request, and the Britons preserved the faith, which they had received, uncorrupted and entire, in peace and tranquillity until...
Page 226 - That island has for its ruler an abbot, who is a priest, to whose direction all the province, and even the bishops contrary to the usual method are subject, according to the example of their first teacher, who was not a bishop, but a priest and monk ; of whose life and discourses some writings are said to be preserved by his disciples.
Page 225 - Columba came into Britain in the ninth year of the reign of Bridius, who was the son of Meilochon, and the powerful king of the Pictish nation, and he converted that nation to the faith of Christ, by his preaching and example...
Page 96 - Regnold and the son of Eadulf, and all those who dwell in Northumbria, as well English as Danes, and Northmen and others, and also the king of the Strathclyde Britons, and all the Strathclyde Britons.
Page 226 - ... priest, to whose direction all the province, and even the bishops contrary to the usual method are subject, according to the example of their first teacher, who was not a bishop, but a priest and monk ; of whose life and discourses some writings are said to be preserved by his disciples. But whatsoever he was himself, this we know for certain, that he left successors renowned for their continency, their love of God, and observance of monastic rules.
Page 225 - His successors hold the island to this day ; he was also buried therein, having died at the age of seventy-seven, about thirty-two years after he came into Britain to preach. Before he passed over into Britain, he had built a noble monastery in Ireland, which, from the great number of oaks, is in the Scottish tongue called Dearm-ach — The Field of Oaks.
Page 253 - At this period the condition of the Highlands, so far as it is discoverable from the few authentic documents which have reached our times, appears to have been in the highest degree rude and uncivilized. There existed a singular combination of Celtic and of feudal manners. Powerful chiefs of Norman name and Norman blood had penetrated into the remotest districts...

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