Game for Anything: Writings on Cricket

Front Cover
Black Inc., 2004 - Cricket - 324 pages
0 Reviews
Cricket is serious fun. And no - one writes about cricket with deeper knowledge or greater flair that Gideon Haigh. Game for Anything collects his best work of the last decade: from probing the Bradman myth and evaluating C.L.R. James to celebrating Len Pascoe and suffering being hit for six. To cricket's recent torments - match - fixing, throwing, sledging, politics - he brings fresh insights and an irreverent with. Game for Anything is a book as rich as the game it describes: grand, humble, funny, sad, sublime, ridiculous.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

A Brief History of Cricket
3
Victor Trumper His Own Sweet Way
10
Jack Gregory The Mighty Atom
23
Cracking Noises
37
Bradman Redux The Greatest Nolongerliving Australian?
48
Eddie Gilbert and Mark Waugh Dark Victory
54
Sir Garfield Sobers The Awkward Hero
62
Steve Waugh World Waugh
71
The Qayyum Inquiry The Incredible Exploding Cricket Team
168
The King Commission The Gang Who Couldnt Shoot Straight
178
The Condon Report The Dog in the Nighttime
185
The ICC What Is the Point of Cricket Administrators?
204
Umpiring Inglorious Uncertainty
215
The Allan Border Medal Playing with Ourselves
224
E W Swanton Lord Jim
235
Ramachandra Guha East Is East
243

Shane Warne Positive Spin
84
R W Wardill The Hero and the Ham
93
G H S Trott The Madness of King Harry
107
Peggy Antonio The Girl Grimmett
125
David Hookes Living in the Seventies
131
Tony Greig Smiling Damnd Villain
137
Chris Tavaré Gentle Man
143
Arjuna Ranatunga Stumbling Block
149
Lawrence Rowe The Enemies of Promise
158
Peter McFarline Journo Man
250
Club Cricket Naughtons Old Boys
269
Australians in England At Home Away
282
Batting The New Golden Age
291
Fielding Ground Force
302
Fast Bowling and Captaincy Just Do It
315
The Future A New World Order?
321
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2004)

Gideon Haigh is an Australian journalist and writer, born in 1965. He was educated at Trinity College at the University of Melbourne. He has contributed to numerous newspapers and magazines in his thirty years as a journalist. He has written thirty books and edited seven others. His book, On Warne, won the British Sports Book Awards Best Cricket Book of the Year Award, the Cricket Society and MCC Book of the Year Award, the Jack Pollard Trophy, and the Waverley Library Nib Award. The Office won the NSW Premier's Literary Awards Douglas Stewart Prize for Non-fiction. Other recent titles include Uncertain Corridors: Writings on Modern Cricket, End of the Road?, and The Deserted Newsroom. He was the winner of the 2016 Ned Kelly Awards best true crime award for Certain Admissions.

Bibliographic information