Game theory and economic modelling

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Clarendon Press, 1990 - Business & Economics - 195 pages
This book examines why game theory has become such a popular tool of analysis. It investigates the deficiencies in this methodology and goes on to consider whether its popularity will fade or remain an important tool for economists. The book provides the reader with some basic concepts fromnoncooperative theory, and then goes on to explore the strengths, weaknesses, and future of the theory as a tool of economic modelling and analysis. All those interested in the applications of game theory to economics, from undergraduates to academics will find this study of particular value.

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User Review  - PaolaM - LibraryThing

This book collects a series of lectures David Kreps delivered as part of the Clarendon Lecture series at Oxford University. They are a concise and beautiful introduction to game theory: you will not ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
Basic notions of noncooperative game theory
9
The successes of game theory
37
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About the author (1990)

About the Authors James N. Baron is the Walter Kenneth Kilpatrick Professor of Organizational Behavior and Human Resources at Stanford University's Graduate School of Business. He has received numerous professional awards and honors, including a fellowship at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences and elected membership in the Sociological Research Association and Macro Organizational Behavior Society. He has served as an advisor on human resource issues to corporations, law firms, government agencies, and nonprofit organizations. David M. Kreps is the Paul E. Holden Professor of Economics at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, and is a Senior Professor by Special Appointment at the Eitan Berglas School of Economics, Tel Aviv University. He is a Fellow of the Econometric Society and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. In 1989, he was awarded the John Bates Clark Medal from the American Economic Association.

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