Gardener's Guide to Tropical Plants: Cool Ways to Add Hot Colors, Bold Foliage, and Striking Textures

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Cool Springs Press, Aug 15, 2012 - Gardening - 240 pages
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Now gardeners can bring an exotic flair to their gardens by introducing the color, textures, and fabulous foliage of tropical plants. Not just for hot climates anymore, bromeliads, orchids, bananas, palms, birds of paradise, elephant ears, canna, and more can bring a touch of the tropics to any garden. Gardener’s can choose from more than 150 plants featured in this book, each chosen for the visual impact it adds to any landscape or container garden. Plants are organized by a range of clearly defined zones, making it easy for gardeners to find the plants that will succeed in their landscape. Author Nellie Neal explains how to best use tropical plants both indoors and out. To make this book a universally useful guide, it is organized to explain how to grow tropical plants in a wide range of clearly defined zones. Further, the book illustrates how to best use these plants in landscapes and containers, indoors and out, no matter where you live. It is a practical, user-friendly celebration of tropical plants.

 

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Contents

Welcome to Growing Tropical Plants
7
Where and How Tropicals Grow
17
Tips and Techniques
27
The More the Merrier
37
Why We Love Tropicals
41
Tropicals in Pots Baskets and Boards
57
Breathe Easier
67
Featured Tropicals
77
Plants for Special Features
213
Resources
218
Photography Credits
219
Maps
220
Index
223
Meet Nellie Neal
229
Gardening Notes
230
Copyright

Plants for Special Sites
208

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2012)

DIVKnown as “The GardenMama” to her radio audiences, Nellie Neal (Jackson, MI) writes and speaks from a solid educational background coupled with a lifetime of gardening successes and failures. She learned to garden from her grandfather in Monroe, Louisiana, and spent summers gardening and crabbing with her great aunt in Gulfport, Mississippi. She blogs weekly at her website, www.gardenmama.com, twice monthly about tropicals for www.nationalgardening.com, and occasionally for Diggin’ It, the online gardening section of the Christian Science Monitor./div

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