Gardening for Profit: A Guide to the Successful Cultivation of the Market and Family Garden

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O. Judd, 1887 - Vegetable gardening - 376 pages
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Page 322 - Kltornate year, the reason of which we infer to be that the insect is harmless to the plant when in the perfect state the first season, but that it is attracted by the plant, deposits its eggs in the soil, and that in the larvae condition, in which it appears the second year, it attacks the root. Whether this crude theory be correct or not, I will not presume to say, but if not, how can we account for the fact of our being able to grow this plant free from its ravages every alternate year, while...
Page 28 - ... conversation I asked him to jump into my wagon, and in ten minutes we alighted at a market garden that had, six years before, been just such a swamp hole as his own, but now (the middle of May) was luxuriant with vegetation. I explained to him what its former condition had been, and that the investing of $500 in drain tiles would, in twelve months, put his in the same condition. He, being a shrewd man, acted on the advice, and at the termination of his lease purchased and paid for his eight acres...
Page 98 - July 2d of 1874, as an experiment, I sowed twelve rows of Sweet Corn and twelve rows of Beets, treading in, after sowing, every alternate row of each. In both cases, those trod in came up in four days, while those unfirmed remained twelve days before starting, and would not then have germinated had not rain fallen, for the soil was dry as dust when the seed were sown.
Page 177 - The ground is then thoroughly plowed and harrowed. No additional manure is used, as enough remains in the ground from the heavy coat it has received in the spring, to carry through the crop of Celery. After the ground has been nicely prepared, lines are struck out on the level surface three feet apart, and the plants set six inches apart in the rows. If the weather is dry at the time of planting, great care should be taken that the roots are properly
Page 309 - In eight or ten days after the herb crop has been planted, the ground is "hoed" lightly over by a steel rake, which disturbs the surface sufficiently to destroy the crop of weeds that are just beginning to germinate ; it is done in one-third of the time that it could be done by...
Page 309 - We use the steel rake in lieu of a hoe on all our crops, immediately after planting, for, as before said, deep hoeing on plants of any kind when newly planted, is quite unnecessary ,and by the steady application of...
Page 309 - ... lightly over by a steel rake, which disturbs the surface sufficiently to destroy the crop of weeds that are just beginning to germinate; it is done in onethird of the time that it could be done with a hoe, and answers the purpose...
Page 36 - One of my neighbors, a market gardener of nearly twenty years' experience, and whose grounds had always been a perfect model of productiveness, had it in prospect to run a sixty-foot street through his grounds. Thinking his land sufficiently rich to carry through a crop of Cabbages without manure, he thought it useless to waste money by using guano on that portion on which the street was to be, but on each side, sowed guano at the rate of 1,200 pounds per acre, and planted the whole with Early Cabbages....
Page 119 - ... injury from late planting than most other vegetables, although at the same time delay should not occur, unless unavoidable, as the sooner it is planted after the ground is in working order, the better will be the result. When there is plenty of ground and the crop is to be extensively grown, perhaps the best mode of planting is in rows three feet apart, the plants nine inches apart in the rows. For private use, or for marketing on a small scale, beds should be formed five feet wide, with three...
Page 2 - Sanitary Drainage of Houses and Towns 2.00 Sanitary Condition in City and Country Dwellings 50 Warington. Chemistry of the Farm 1.00 White. Gardening for the South 2.00 FRUITS, FLOWERS, ETC. American Rose Culturist so American Weeds and Useful Plants BouSSingaUlt.

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