Gargantua

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Hesperus, 2003 - Fiction - 151 pages
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As a companion volume to Pantagruel, this new edition of Gargantua continues Rabelais’ acclaimed fantasy of a mythical family of giants. Gargantua introduces Pantagruel’s father—another wondrous giant. As he tells Gargantua’s life story from his birth and education to his later life, Rabelais uses the events of the giant’s life to parody medieval and classical learning, mock traditional ecclesiastical authority, and proffer his own thoughts on humanism and society. Marked with the same warm humor, obsession with food, and scatological wit of Pantagruel, Gargantua is a further striking burlesque on Rabelais’ contemporaries and a glorious outpouring of Renaissance plenitude.

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About the author (2003)

Francois Rabelais is known through his work more than through the details of his life, which are scanty. Born in the late fifteenth century, he first chose the monastic life, then left to become a lay priest and make a career as a physician, teacher, and writer. Donald M. Frame, (1911-1991) was Professor of French at Columbia University, and a renowned translator of, and expert on, Montaigne and Moliere as well as Rabelais. Raymond C. La Charite is Professor of French at the University of Kentucky and editor of "French Forum" and French Forum Monographs.

Andrew Brown is a medical doctor and radiologist turned scientific biographer. His biography of Sir James Chadwick, discoverer of the neutron, 'The Neutron and the Bomb', was published by Oxford University Press in 1997. He has also published a number of scientific papers and articles.

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