Gargantua and Pantagruel: Easyread Comfort Edition

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ReadHowYouWant.com, Nov 1, 2006 - Fiction - 316 pages
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Consisting of five books, this masterpiece is Rabelais' magnum opus. It chronicles different events in the life of Gargantua and his son Pantagruel. Using his learned wit and biting satire as a facade, Rabelais discusses several serious issues. The apparent humour and brilliant use of language offers pure reading pleasure. Entertaining and profound!
 

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Contents

Chapter 1
1
Chapter 2
6
Chapter 3
10
Chapter 4
14
Chapter 5
19
Chapter 6
23
Chapter 7
27
Chapter 8
31
Chapter 35
136
Chapter 36
139
Chapter 37
143
Chapter 38
149
Chapter 39
152
Chapter 40
155
Chapter 41
159
Chapter 42
163

Chapter 9
34
Chapter 10
40
Chapter 11
43
Chapter 12
47
Chapter 13
53
Chapter 14
58
Chapter 15
62
Chapter 16
67
Chapter 17
71
Chapter 18
76
Chapter 19
80
Chapter 20
84
Chapter 21
88
Chapter 22
92
Chapter 23
96
Chapter 24
99
Chapter 25
102
Chapter 26
105
Chapter 27
109
Chapter 28
113
Chapter 29
116
Chapter 30
119
Chapter 31
122
Chapter 32
124
Chapter 33
129
Chapter 34
132
Chapter 43
166
Chapter 44
170
Chapter 45
174
Chapter 46
179
Chapter 47
184
Chapter 48
187
Chapter 49
191
Chapter 50
195
Chapter 51
199
Chapter 52
203
Chapter 53
210
Chapter 54
216
Chapter 55
219
Chapter 56
223
Chapter 57
227
Chapter 58
232
Chapter 59
235
Chapter 60
239
Chapter 61
243
Chapter 62
247
Chapter 63
252
Chapter 64
257
Chapter 65
262
Chapter 66
266
Chapter 67
270
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About the author (2006)

One of the leading humanist writers of the French Renaissance, Rabelais was at first a Franciscan and then a Benedictine monk, a celebrated physician and professor of anatomy, and later cure of Meudon. The works of Rabelais are filled with life to the overflowing, hence the term "Rabelaisian." His principal protagonists, Gargantua and his son, Pantagruel, are appropriately giants, not only in size, but also in spirit and action. The five books of their adventures are separate works, containing, in different measure, adventures, discussions, farcical scenes, jokes, games, satires, philosophical commentaries, and anything else that a worldly, learned man of genius such as Rabelais could pour into his work. His style is innovative and idiosyncratic, marked by humorous neologisms made up from the learned languages, Greek and Latin, side by side with the most earthy, humble, and rough words of the street and barnyard. His Gargantua, published in 1534, satirizes the traditional education of Parisian theologians and, in the Abbe de Theleme episode, recommends a free, hedonistic society of handsome young men and women in contrast to the restrictive life of monasticism. The gigantic scope of Rabelais's work also reflects the Renaissance thirst for encyclopedic knowledge.

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