Gay and lesbian rights: a reference handbook

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ABC-CLIO, Oct 27, 2009 - Political Science - 301 pages
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When it was first published in 1994, "Gay and Lesbian Rights: A Reference Handbook" was acclaimed in "School Library Journal" for taking "a sober and balanced approach in addressing this emotionally charged and complex topic." The new edition shows just how far the nation has come in securing legal protections regardless of sexual orientation--and how far we still have to go.

"Gay and Lesbian Rights: A Reference Handbook, Second Edition" provides a history of the gay liberation and gay rights movements in the United States and other parts of the world. Maintaining the careful approach of the first edition, it addresses a range of current issues from housing and employment discrimination to military service to same-sex marriage and adoption laws. Wholly rewritten, with almost 80 percent new material, it is the ideal introduction to one of the most important civil rights issues in the world today.

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Contents

Problems Controversies and Solutions
35
Worldwide Perspective
85
Chronology
119
Copyright

6 other sections not shown

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About the author (2009)

DAVID E. NEWTON David E. Newton has published extensively on chemistry and other science subjects. He is the award-winning author of numerous books, articles, and scholarly publications, including The Chemical Elements, Science in the 1920s, The Ozone Dilemma, Encyclopedia of Cryptology, Chemistry of Carbon Compounds, Problems in Chemistry, Global Warming, Encyclopedia of the Chemical Elements, and Social Issues in Science and Technology. Newton received his doctorate in science education from Harvard University.