Gehäuse der Mnemosyne: Architektur als Schriftform der Erinnerung

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Harald Tausch
Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2003 - History - 336 pages
Die Beiträge beschäftigen sich mit der doppelten Rolle der Architektur für die Ordnung des Raumes wie für die Ordnung des Wissens zwischen Früher Neuzeit und der Zeit um 1800. Untersucht werden Beziehungen zwischen Architekturtheorien und -darstellungen in Texten, zwischen der Wahrnehmung von Architektur und der Konstitution von Gedächtnisräumen durch Architektur.
 

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Contents

Vorwort
7
MICHAEL NIEDERMEIER
16
NIcoLAs PETH
23
ANITA TRANINGER
41
ElisABETH voN SAMsoNow
61
HARALD TAUscH
79
ULRICH SCHÜTTE
123
CoRNELIA JöcHNER
151
Wir waren vor den Hohenzollern da Zur politischen Ikonogra
171
MICHAEL HEssE
209
MAscHA BIsPING
233
ANKE TE HEEsEN
263
HANSGEoRG voN ARBURG
287
JoAcHIM REEs
311
Copyright

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Page 36 - The sense of space and in the end the sense of time were both powerfully affected. Buildings, landscapes, etc., were exhibited in proportions so vast as the bodily eye is not fitted to receive. Space swelled, and was amplified to an extent of unutterable infinity.
Page 36 - Piranesi busy on his aspiring labours : and so on, until the unfinished stairs and Piranesi both are lost in the upper gloom of the hall. With the same power of endless growth and self-reproduction did my architecture proceed in dreams.
Page 36 - Some of these rambles led me to great distances; for an opium-eater is too happy to observe the motion of time. And sometimes, in my attempts to steer homewards, upon nautical principles, by fixing my eye on the pole-star, and seeking ambitiously for a north-west passage, instead of circumnavigating all the capes and head-lands I had doubled in my outward voyage, I came suddenly upon such knotty problems of alleys, such enigmatical entries, and such sphinx's riddles of streets without thoroughfares,...
Page 36 - ... thou buildest upon the bosom of darkness, out of the fantastic imagery of the brain, cities and temples, beyond the art of Phidias and Praxiteles, beyond the splendour of Babylon and Hekatompylos ; and " from the anarchy of dreaming sleep...
Page 35 - I will admit that markets and theatres are not the appropriate haunts of the opium-eater when in the divinest state incident to his enjoyment. In that state crowds become an oppression to him ; music, even, too sensual and gross. He naturally seeks solitude and silence, as indispensable conditions of those trances, or profoundest reveries, which are the crown and consummation of what opium can do for human nature.

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