Gems and Precious Stones of North America: A Popular Description of Their Occurrence, Value, History, Archæology, and of the Collections in which They Exist, Also a Chapter on Pearls, and on Remarkable Foreign Gems Owned in the United States. Illustrated with Eight Colored Plates and Numerous Minor Engravings

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Scientific Publishing Company, 1890 - Gems - 336 pages
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Page 140 - ... the bleached trunks of the ancient forests. In the steeper middle portion of the mountain face, rows of upright trunks stand out on the ledges like the columns of a ruined temple. On the more gentle slopes farther down, but where it is still too steep to support vegetation, save a few pines, the petrified trunks fairly cover the surface, and were at first supposed by us to be the shattered remains of a recent forest.
Page 209 - On reaching the source of the Pipestone creek, in the valley of which the Pipestone bed is located, I was surprised to see how inconspicuous a place it is. Indeed, had I not known of the existence of a roc.k in this locality so celebrated in this region, I should have passed it by almost unnoticed. A single glance at the red quartzites here, assured me that these rocks were of the same age with those before mentioned at James and Vermilion rivers, and at Sioux Falls. The layer of Pipestone is about...
Page 241 - It is strange that this little glistening bead, the pearl, should have been the cause of so much movement in the world as it has been. There must be something essentially beautiful in it, however, for it has been dear to the eyes both of civilized and of uncivilized people. The dark-haired Roman lady, in the palmiest days of Rome, cognizant of all the beautiful productions in the world, valued the pearl as highly as ever did the simple Indian woman...
Page 136 - ... wood buried in soil soaked with some petrifying material becomes highly charged with the same and the cells filled with...
Page 124 - At the doorway of his wigwam Sat the ancient Arrow-maker, In the land of the Dacotahs, Making arrow-heads of jasper, Arrow-heads of chalcedony. At his side, in all her beauty, Sat the lovely Minnehaha, Sat his daughter, Laughing Water, Plaiting mats of flags and rushes; Of the past the old man's thoughts were, And the maiden's of the future. He was thinking, as he sat there...
Page 298 - Some of the trachytic porphyry which forms the substance of the hills had happened to have cooled, under suitable conditions, from the molten state into a sort of slag, or volcanic glass, which is the obsidian in question ; and, in places, this vitreous lava, from one layer having flowed over another which was already cool, was regularly stratified.
Page 266 - Campment d'Our's, and at two places on the east shore of Lake George, and on Lake Huron, Ont. It is a rock consisting of a matrix of white quartzite, in which are pebbles often several inches across, of a rich red, yellow, green or black jasper, and smoky or other colored chalcedony, which form a remarkably striking contrast with the pure white matrix. It is susceptible of a very high polish, and has been made into a great variety of ornamental objects, such as vases, paper weights, etc. Some very...
Page 249 - most on the Sea side make Money and Store up shells in Summer against Winter whereof to make their money.
Page 20 - ... gold washings of JD Twitty's mine, in Rutherford County. It became the property of the late General TL Clingman, of Asheville, who for many years took great interest and did great service in developing the mineral resources of North Carolina. This stone was described by Prof. Charles U. Shepard/ who announced the existence of itacolumite in the gold-bearing region of North Carolina, at the meeting of the American Association of Geologists and Naturalists in 1845, and under the impression that...
Page 56 - ... Persian material. The microscopic and chemical characters of the turquoise are presented in some detail in Part III. Concerning the origin of the turquoise several opinions have been advanced. Professor Silliman regarded the alteration of the rock as probably due " to the escape * * * of heated vapor of water and perhaps of other vapors or gases, by the action of which the original crystalline structure of the mass has been completely decomposed or metamorphosed, with the production of new chemical...

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