Gems; Notes and Extracts

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Bell & Daldy, 1871 - Gems - 241 pages
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Page 227 - Sweet colour of the oriental sapphire, That was upgathered in the cloudless aspect Of the pure air, as far as the first circle, Unto mine eyes did recommence delight Soon as I issued forth from the dead air, Which had with sadness filled mine eyes and breast. The beauteous planet, that to love incites, Was making all the orient to laugh, Veiling the Fishes that were in her escort. To the right hand I turned, and fixed my mind Upon the other pole, and saw four...
Page 92 - The Duke of Orleans, Regent of France during the minority of Louis XV...
Page 156 - When an onyx has one or two strata of red carnelian, it is more valued and takes the name of sardonyx. In the onyx the dark strata are always opaque and contrast strongly with the clear, which, when thinned, become almost translucent.
Page 33 - It crystallizes in the form of a hexagon, terminated at the two heads by a species of cone with six facets. These crystals are often in masses, and the base is always less colored than the top. Amethysts are generally found in metalliferous mountains, and are always in combination with quartz and agate. They...
Page 90 - It is cut as a brilliant, and weighs 5 1 carats. nople; according to others, it ornamented the helmet of Charles the Bold, who lost it at the battle of Granson. It was found by a Swiss soldier, who sold it to a priest for two francs; it disappeared then for some time, until, in the year 1589, King Anthony of Portugal pledged it among other stones to De Sancy, then treasurer of the King of France, who retained it by paying 100,000 livres Fig. 38.— The Sancy. (coinage of Tours). Henry III., after...
Page 23 - It takes a very good polish. It is never found in regular forms, but always either in nodules, in stalactites, or in irregular masses. Eye agates consist of those parts of the stone in which the cutting discovers circular bands of very small diameter arranged with regularity round one circular spot. These circles are frequently so perfect that they appear to be traced by the compass.
Page 76 - One of the most beautiful qualities of the diamond is its power of refraction ; that of water is 0.785 ; ruby, 0.739; rock crystal, 0.654; and the diamond, 1.396. The refraction of the diamond is single in the entire crystals ; when broken it possesses double, but imperfect, refraction in thin layers. The value of the diamond is dependent on its color, size, and the finish or cut given during...
Page 76 - ... specific gravity of the pure diamond varies from 3.5 to 3.6 ; that of the black diamond is from 3.012 to 3.255.
Page 22 - ... from 2.58 to 2.69. The agate, properly so called, is naturally translucent, less transparent than crystalline quartz, but yet less opaque than jasper. It is too hard to be even scratched by rock crystal. It takes a very good polish. It is never found in regular forms, but always either in nodules, in stalactites, or in irregular masses. Eye agates consist of those parts of the stone in which the cutting discovers circular bands of very small diameter arranged with regularity round one circular...
Page 153 - EYE consists of a quartz mixed with parallel fibres of asbestus and amianthus. It is found in pebbles and in pieces more or less round ; it has a concave fracture ; is translucent and also transparent at the edges. It has a vitreous and resinous light. It is generally either green, red, yellow or gray. It marks glass. Its specific gravity is from 2.56 to 2.73. When exposed to a great heat it loses lustre and transparency, but does not melt under the blowpipe unless reduced to minute fragments. Many...

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