Gender in African women's writing: identity, sexuality, and difference

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Indiana University Press, 1997 - Literary Criticism - 188 pages
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"This is a cogent analysis of the complexities of gender in the work of nine contemporary Anglophone and Francophone novelists.... offers illuminating interpretations of worthy writers... " -- Multicultural Review

"This book reaffirms Bessie Head's remark that books are a tool, in this case a tool that allows readers to understand better the rich lives and the condition of African women. Excellent notes and a rich bibliography." -- Choice

"... a college-level analysis which will appeal to any interested in African studies and literature." -- The Bookwatch

This book applies gender as a category of analysis to the works of nine sub-Saharan women writers: Aidoo, Bá, Beyala, Dangarembga, Emecheta, Head, Liking, Tlali, and Zanga Tsogo. The author appropriates western feminist theories of gender in an African literary context, and in the process, she finds and names critical theory that is African, indigenous, self-determining, which she then melds with western feminist theory and comes out with an over-arching theory that enriches western, post-colonial and African critical perspectives.

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Contents

Introduction
1
Womens Writing
16
African Womens Writing as a Weapon
148
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

Juliana Makuchi Nfah-Abbenyi, Assistant Professor of English & Post-Colonial Literature, University of Southern Mississippi, has contributed essays to Postcolonial African Writers: A Bio-Bibliographical Sourcebook, Oral Literature in Africa Today, and Womanhood and (M)othering in African Literature.

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