Gender-role Identity Development During Adolescence: Individual, Familial, and Social Contextual Predictors of Gender Intensification

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ProQuest, 2008 - 64 pages
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Despite frequent allusions to gender intensification in the research literature, only a few studies have examined longitudinal changes in gender-role attributes across adolescence. The set of studies presented here tests some of the fundamental assumptions of the gender intensification hypothesis (Hill & Lynch, 1983) by examining gender-role identity development during early adolescence. Study 1 tested the gender intensification hypothesis directly, by examining whether boys become more masculine and girls become more feminine across the transition to adolescence. Results from longitudinal data collected at ages 11, 13, and 15, indicated that contemporary adolescents' gender-role identity development does not conform to the pattern predicted by the gender intensification hypothesis. Rather, contemporary girls consistently report greater femininity than boys across ages 11-15, while contemporary girls and boys report equal levels of masculinity across ages 11-15.
 

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Contents

Abstract
1
Discussion
23
Tables
33
Figures
39
Appendices
47
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