Gene Autry and the Ghost Riders

Front Cover
Wildside Press LLC, 2009 - Juvenile Fiction - 280 pages
0 Reviews
Gene Autry meets the Ghost Riders in this 1955 in this young adult novel, originally published in 1955. [Facsimile Reprint Edition]
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Beast of Prey
9
String Im Up
22
A Frightened Man
35
Too Close for Comfort
50
Up on Black Mesa
63
Questions and Answers
76
EndoftheTrail
90
We Got Him
103
Trap at TwoBar
167
Gloria Takes a Hand
180
Just TwentyFour Hours
193
Sworn to Kill
207
Captured
213
Black Mesa
226
Under Fire
237
The Whole Story
251

Social Calls
116
Wantedfor Murder
129
No Time to Waste
143
Newt Raglan Killer
156
The Game Is Up
265
The Best Part of Living
278
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2009)

Lewis Byford Patten was a prolific author of American Western novels, born in Denver, Colorado in 1915. He often published under the names Lewis Ford, Len Leighton and Joseph Wayne. He used the last two names when writing in collaboration with Wayne D. Overholser. He died on May 22, 1981. His novels included Trail to Vicksburg (1997), Death Rides the Denver Stage (1999), The Woman at Ox-Yoke (2000) and Blood on the Grass (2002).

Gene Autry (1907-1998), the legendary singing cowboy of the 1930s, '40s, and '50s, won the hearts of Americans with his golden voice and rugged good looks. He became one of the most popular actors of his day, playing Everyman western heroes in scores of films as well as on radio and television shows.

Autry also wrote, or cowrote, over two hundred songs, including "Back in the Saddle Again," and recorded an impressive string of holiday classics, including "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer," "Here Comes Santa Claus," "Frosty the Snowman," and "Here Comes Peter Cottontail." High among his many awards and honors were induction into the Country Music Hall of Fame and the National Cowboy Hall of Fame, five stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, and a town in Oklahoma that was named after him. In later life, he was as successful a businessman and producer as he had been a performer and served as the driving force behind the creation of the Autry Museum of Western Heritage.

Bibliographic information