General Economic History

Front Cover
Cosimo, Inc., Nov 1, 2007 - Business & Economics - 401 pages
Considered one of the founders of modern sociology, German sociologist and historian MAX WEBER (1864-1920) long studied the impact of religion on culture-is most famous work is 1905's The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism-but he was also renowned as a thinker on economic issues. Here, in this classic collection of lectures first published in English in 1927 and translated by American economist Frank Hyneman Knight (1885-1972), Weber brings his keen and lively sociological eye to the history of commerce, money, and industrial endeavor, discussing: . agricultural organization and the problem of agrarian communism . the house community and the clan . the evolution of the family as conditioned by economic factors . the condition of the peasants before the entrance of capitalism . capitalistic development of the manor . stages in the development of industry and mining . the origin of the European guilds . the factory and its forerunners . forms of organization of transportation and commerce . money and monetary history . the meaning of modern capitalism . the first great speculative crisis . citizenship as an economic concept . the evolution of the capitalistic spirit . and much more.
 

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Contents

I
1
II
3
III
26
IV
28
V
37
VI
43
VII
46
VIII
51
XXVI
215
XXVII
220
XXVIII
223
XXIX
230
XXX
236
XXXI
254
XXXII
267
XXXIII
273

IX
65
X
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XI
79
XII
84
XIII
92
XIV
113
XV
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XVI
122
XVII
136
XVIII
144
XIX
153
XX
162
XXI
178
XXII
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XXIII
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XXIV
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XXV
202
XXXIV
275
XXXV
276
XXXVI
279
XXXVII
286
XXXVIII
292
XXXIX
298
XL
302
XLI
315
XLII
338
XLIII
343
XLIV
347
XLV
352
XLVI
371
XLVII
383
XLVIII
385
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About the author (2007)

Max Weber, a German political economist, legal historian, and sociologist, had an impact on the social sciences that is difficult to overestimate. According to a widely held view, he was the founder of the modern way of conceptualizing society and thus the modern social sciences. His major interest was the process of rationalization, which characterizes Western civilization---what he called the "demystification of the world." This interest led him to examine the three types of domination or authority that characterize hierarchical relationships: charismatic, traditional, and legal. It also led him to the study of bureaucracy; all of the world's major religions; and capitalism, which he viewed as a productof the Protestant ethic. With his contemporary, the French sociologist Emile Durkheim---they seem not to have known each other's work---he created modern sociology.

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