General History of the World: From the Earliest Times Until the Year 1831, Volume 2

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C. F. Stollmeyer, 1841 - World history
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Page 39 - After some negotiation, the king was satisfied with a ransom of five thousand pounds of gold, thirty thousand pounds of silver, and a proportionate quantity of other precious things.
Page 209 - Carloman, after whose death Charles the Simple was excluded from the throne, which was occupied by Charles the Thick. Charles the Thick upon the throne of Charles the Great was a caricature of weakness and contempt ; this master of nations, harrassed, humiliated by every foreign and internal enemy, a passive tool in the hand of his minister, an inactive spectator of the sufferings of his people, was covered with domestic as well as public disgrace. Then Arnulph, duke of Carinthia, Carloman's natural...
Page 233 - ... his margraviate. The pope meanwhile had again placed Henry under the ban, and given his support to Rudolph ; but Henry resolved to avenge himself on the pope. Accompanied by an anti-pope, Archbishop Guibert of Ravenna, chosen pontiff by a synod held at Brixen, he set out for Italy, 1081, conquered Rome, caused himself to be crowned emperor, and besieged Gregory in the Castle of St. Angelo. The pope remained a prisoner in the castle for three years, but was at length liberated by Robert Guiscard,...
Page 74 - ... retaining their ancient laws and customs (the Franks had not yet any fixed system of government), but nevertheless subjugated, and under the obligation of service. The northern part of the country, about the Main, and on the west bank of the Rhine, as far as Worms, was occupied by Prankish colonies, and bears to this day the name which was derived from them. During the same year in which he conquered the Alemanni, Clovis, true to his vow, was baptised at Rheims, and with him three thousand Franks,...
Page 343 - Then the kings commenced — several had done so already previously — to restore their favor to the nobles, as the enemy of popular power. Thus between the throne and the nobles, an alliance — not exactly sincere, but confirmed by the true interest of the last and the apparent of the first — was now concluded to keep down the commons, and it has — setting aside some solitary exceptions, which are founded upon particular relations — continued to exist until the latest times. LAWS AND CUSTOMS....
Page 159 - ... influence of the cloister; even their splendor and luxury served to animate industry. The nobler harvests of the arts and sciences flourished also in or by the cloisters. In them alone the muses found an asylum — although miserable — during the tumult of arms in the middle ages. Many cloisters and orders have made the sciences the principal object of their efforts ; and their collections, their institutions, their scientific works, have always borne precious fruits — often, however, unacceptable...
Page 12 - Haemus before their western expeditions;(their kindred race, the Gepidae, established themselves later in Pannonia.) After them came the terrible Huns, whose appearance in Europe had been the principal signal of these great movements, who drove on before themselves, and drew along a whole flood of tribes as far as the Loire and Po; the wild Bulgari, Avari, Ugri, Chasari, &c., followed the Huns. These national expeditions continued in the sixth century (or the second of the present period), and did...
Page 117 - ... an exuberant, bold fancy, and an enthusiasm, that is easily inflamed. They are fond of poetry, and they can be managed better by the power of words, than by that of the sceptre or sword. They are proud of freedom, intrepid, persevering, temperate, serious, magnanimous and hospitable; but they are also rapacious, revengeful, passionate, unquiet and inconstant. They are dangerous enemies, and allies not to be trusted; they measure their duty according to their benevolence, their right according...
Page 302 - Mawaralnahar, te the country between the Oxus and the laxartes, a power built upon the ruins of the Soffaridian dominion. Bokhara was the capital. Many nations of the steppes acknowledged the law of the Samanides. But luxury and relaxation undermined this throne erected by wild courage. It was overthrown by the Gaznevides (998). At the time of the Samanides, the Dilemites ruled in the southern provinces of the Caspian sea. Their kingdom was destroyed by the Buides. These Buides have their origin...
Page 452 - Cas* triota, whom the Turks call Iskander Beg (prince Alexander), lord (despot) of Epirus, and John Hunnyades, way wode of Transylvania, were these heroes. The exploits of these two heroes, who defied the Ottoman power, border on the marvellous. Pope Eugene IV., faithful to his alliance with the Greek emperor, endeavoured to raise a general Crusade against the Turks. But only some Italian states that were threatened most by the sword of the Turks, then the knights of Rhodes, and finally the young...

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