General History of the World: From the Earliest Times Until the Year 1831, Volume 2

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Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1842 - World history
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Page 291 - ... kindled this fire : for the Cardinal Bessarion, patriarch of Constantinople, and archbishop of Nicea, in his oration for the unity of the Greek and Latin Church, shewed that the Bishop of Rome, when he had called a general council, took upon him, upon his own private authority, to add this parcel, ie of the proceeding of the Holy Ghost from the Father and the Son, to the common Creed, without the consent of the rest of the bishops there assembled.
Page 39 - After some negotiation, the king was satisfied with a ransom of five thousand pounds of gold, thirty thousand pounds of silver, and a proportionate quantity of other precious things.
Page 239 - Welphs ; — and this family, renovated by him, who called himself Welph, as his maternal ancestors, flourished again, and with far greater splendor than before. For from this second root the stock has sprung, whose crown covers Britain and Hanover, and vast countries in all parts of the world. Henry, irritated at the election of Conrad, delayed to give up the imperial jewels ; but Conrad resolved to take from him a part of his fiefs. Henry took up arms, and refused to appear peaceably at the diets....
Page 207 - Carloman, after whose death Charles the Simple was excluded from the throne, which was occupied by Charles the Thick. Charles the Thick upon the throne of Charles the Great was a caricature of weakness and contempt ; this master of nations, harrassed, humiliated by every foreign and internal enemy, a passive tool in the hand of his minister, an inactive spectator of the sufferings of his people, was covered with domestic as well as public disgrace. Then Arnulph, duke of Carinthia, Carloman's natural...
Page 231 - ... his margraviate. The pope meanwhile had again placed Henry under the ban, and given his support to Rudolph ; but Henry resolved to avenge himself on the pope. Accompanied by an anti-pope, Archbishop Guibert of Ravenna, chosen pontiff by a synod held at Brixen, he set out for Italy, 1081, conquered Rome, caused himself to be crowned emperor, and besieged Gregory in the Castle of St. Angelo. The pope remained a prisoner in the castle for three years, but was at length liberated by Robert Guiscard,...
Page 54 - ... after the assassination of Valentinian III., experienced the heavy hand of the avenger, who was invited thither by Valentinian's widow (455). All the succeeding emperors, until the fall of the Western Empire, trembled before him. Majorianus alone summoned the courage for a powerful attack, but Genseric burnt his fleet. A second, and still greater enterprise, fitted out by both empires, under Leo and Anthemius, was destroyed in the vicinity of Carthage. Genseric, more insolent than before, put...
Page 157 - ... influence of the cloister ; even their splendor and luxury served to animate industry. The nobler harvests of the arts and sciences flourished also in or by the cloisters. In them alone the muses found an asylum — although miserable — during the tumult of arms in the middle ages. Many cloisters and orders have made the sciences the principal object of their efforts ; and their collections, their institutions, their scientific works, have always borne precious fruits — often, however, unacceptable...
Page 454 - Bajazeth's defeat, captivity and death Europe and Africa trembled at this news. But the Turkish and Mameluke sultans, as well as the Greek emperor, conjured by entreaties and tribute, the threatening tempest, and Timour directed his steps slowly towards Samarcand (1404), where he celebrated his victories by magnificent triumphs. Already however, when in Syria, this insatiable conqueror had looked eagerly towards China. Informed of the internal disorders of that empire, he founded upon them the hope...
Page 340 - Hence originated a complicated contest, multifariously directed by the course of events, as well as by personal talents and passions, and on this account extremely changeable; in which we discern indeed, as in every political contest, the two principal ideas, liberty and dominion, as the poles of the efforts of the opposite sides; but we see the same ideas according to the point of view of the combatants, leading to* quite different intermediate ends; so that the same principle, dominion, makes kings...
Page 132 - Under Al-Walid (705), his son, the Arabian power attained the summit of its grandeur. The civil wars had fostered the courage of the nation, and increased its force by practice. When its combined power was now directed abroad, no other was able to cope with it. Al-Walid remained quiet in Damascus, but his generals extended their victories in three parts of the world, and planted the standard of Mohammed on the banks of the laxartes and at the foot of the Pyrenees. One of them, Katibah (the camel-driver),...

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