General Principles of the Structure of Language, Volume 2

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K. Paul, Trench, Trübner & Company, Limited, 1892 - Grammar, Comparative and general - 404 pages
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Contents

Object suffixes
13
Formations of substantives and adjectives
21
6062 Declension arthritic nature of final n and na
25
Numerals their gender declension and construction
27
Prepositions conjunctions adverbial and negative particles
28
Verbal expression of position in time
29
Construction of verbal nouns seems to indicate strong sense of process
30
No abstract copula
32
Constructions for the relative pronoun
33
120121 Phonesis shows a tendency to utter with small pressure of breath from the chest the syllable the accent
69
Pluriliteral verbal roots contraction of the object of thought
73
Tenses and moods reduction of subjective process in the verb
75
126128 Formations of nominal stems
76
Distinction of gender
80
Case construct state
81
Pronouns object suffixes affection of nouns and of adjec tives with possessive suffixes
82
Numerals their construction
84
Adverbial expression
85
Imperfect concords of substantive and adjective and of verb and subject substitute for the copula
86
Phonesis softer than Ethiopic and with less pressure of breath from the chest
87
Gender number and case
88
146 Approach to the fragmentariness of African speech
90
Example
91
Spoken by the Tuariks in the Sahara
92
Consonants and vowels
93
Pronouns suffixes
94
155159 No adjective except participles person elements of verb expression of tense vowel changes participles derived forms negation interrogation
95
Object suffixes suffixes attracted by any particle which affects a verb
96
Pronouns
97
Example
98
171 Reduction in Africa of the object of the act of thought
101
Object suffixes
103
Case endings
107
Emphatic sutlix of the noun compared with the definite
112
Historical sketch of the language
118
Teutonic languages Grimms law of the changes of
132
Composition
145
Comparison of adjectives Latin Greek Zend and Sanskrit
152
Degrees of comparison of adjectives distinction of genders
162
Primitive system of the Celtic verb
173
Elements of relation
180
changing the radical vowel which indicates a tendency of thought to spread corresponding to a degree of slowness in mental action 227
195
arthritic formation 144 in Gothic AngloSaxon
197
Lithuanian
224
Nominal stems
228
202204 Old Slavonic phonesis much less vocalic than Lithu anian with weak pressure of breath from the chest indolent and tenacious
241
Nominal stems compound nominal stems
243
207210 Declension of nouns and pronouns
244
Declension of adjectives comparative degree
249
Formation of the nonpresent parts of the verb
250
Present parts of the verb
251
Person endings
252
218 Slavonic takes up into the root elements of thought expressed by changes of its vowels
253
Weakened sense of gender tendency to drop the element of living force
254
Cardinal numerals their gender
255
Expression of the passive and middle
256
Concord in number between verb and subject
257
Construction of infinitive with dative verb thought in the process of accomplishment
258
Bask
269
Declension of pronouns
272
Formation of verbal and derivative nouns
275
THE FEATURES OP LANGUAGE WHICH ACCOMPANY THE HABITS
281
IILThe sense of the personality of the subject in the verb is propor
289
the IndoEuropean and SvroArabian
300
Verb strong sense of process ten conjugations
305
The expression of position in time is separate from the verb
308
Connective t in nonconjugational parts
313
the SyroArabian
314
SyroArabian languages
315
the African languages
316
the Dravidian and the languages of Central and Northern Asia and Northern Europe
317
the Chinese group of languages
318
The second correspondence traced through the African Ian guages
319
the American languages
321
the Polynesian and Melanesian languages
322
The second correspondence found in Tamil
323
the IndoEuropean languages
324
The verb tends to follow what it governs when action has to he habitually suited with care to object and condition 1 The above correspondence trace...
325
the languages of the African nomads of the indus trial Asiatic races and the IndoEuropean
326
the SyroArabian languages
327
the American languages
328
The second
332
Expression of personal possession
333
The governing word or element is carried into close connection with tlie governed and elements of relation thought with a due sense of both correlati...
334
the Chinese group of languages complete account
357
IndoEuropean languages
365
CHAPTER IV
376
In Celtic
384
The peculiar endowment in man from which language springs
404

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