Genetic and Acquired Disorders: Current Topics and Interventions for Educators

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Paul C. McCabe, Steven R. Shaw
SAGE Publications, Feb 23, 2010 - Medical - 171 pages
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Educators often face the pressure to address children's medical needs within the school setting, but sometimes find themselves having to make difficult decisions without adequate training, support, or information about important pediatric issues. When faced with a medical question, many may turn to the Internet where information is sometimes reliable, sometimes not.

This concise and well-researched investigation into genetic and acquired health issues provides credibility and verifiability of data and establishes a foundation of confidence for any educator who must make policy, differentiate instruction, provide educational accommodations, offer special education services, collaborate with families, and work with the community to serve to children's medical, physical, and psychological needs.

Written for school psychologists, counsellors, administrators, and teachers, this highly practical and easy-to-understand reference describes genetic, chromosomal, and acquired disorders and discusses behavioural issues that may manifest themselves in classrooms as well as treatment options and intervention strategies. Readers will find:

- A section on chromosomal, genetic, and metabolic disorders covering topics such as phenylketonuria, the genetics of autism, the biology of shyness, and families of children with genetic disorders

- A section on acquired disorders with chapters on prenatal alcohol exposure, prenatal exposure to antidepressants, celiac disease, maternal post-partum depression and behaviour problems, asthma and quality of life, food allergies in the classroom, and diabetes.

Each chapter includes a case study, parent handouts, and a literature review based on the latest and best scientific research.

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About the author (2010)

Paul C. McCabe, NCSP, is an associate professor of school psychology in the School Psychologist Graduate Program at Brooklyn College of the City University of New York. McCabe is a New York State certified school psychologist, New York State licensed psychologist, and a Nationally Certified School Psychologist (NCSP). He serves on the editorial boards of several publications in school psychology and developmental psychology, and has consulted at state and national levels on issues of early childhood assessment and best practices, pediatric issues in schools, and training in school psychology. McCabe conducts and publishes research in early childhood social, behavioral, and language development and concomitant problems; pediatric school psychology and health issues addressed by schools; and social justice issues in training, especially training educators to advocate for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered youth. McCabe received his PhD in clinical and school psychology from Hofstra University. He holds undergraduate degrees from University of Rochester and Cazenovia College.

Steven R. Shaw, NCSP, is an assistant professor in the Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology at McGill University in Montreal, Quebec. He has been a school psychologist since 1988 with clinical and administrative experience in schools, hospitals, and independent practice. He has conducted workshops and consulted with educational policy makers to address the needs of children with borderline intellectual functioning in the US, Canada, Pakistan, Moldova, Poland, India, and Egypt. Shaw conducts and publishes research in behavior and language development in children with rare genetic disorders; resilience factors for children with risk factors for school failure, especially borderline intellectual functioning; and pediatric school psychology and health issues addressed by schools. Shaw received a PhD in school psychology from the University of Florida.

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