Genetic Psychology for Teachers

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D. Appleton, 1903 - Educational psychology - 329 pages
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Page 72 - said Franke, 'must be forbidden in any and all of its forms. The children shall be instructed in this matter in such a way as to show them, through the presentation of religious principles, the wastefulness and folly of all play. They shall be led to see that play will distract their hearts and minds from God, the eternal Good, and will work nothing but harm to their spiritual lives.
Page 260 - No truth, however abstract, is ever perceived, that will not probably at some time influence our earthly action. You must remember that, when I talk of action here, I mean action in the widest sense. I mean speech, I mean writing, I mean yeses and noes, and tendencies ' from ' things and tendencies ' toward ' things, and emotional determinations ; and I mean them in the future as well as in the immediate present. As I talk here, and you listen, it might seem as if no action followed. You might call...
Page 14 - I say then that pictures of things and thin shapes are emitted from things off their surface, to which an image serves as a kind of film, or name it if you like a rind, because such image bears an appearance and form like to the thing whatever it is from whose body it is shed and wanders forth. This you may learn however dull of apprehension from what follows. First of all since among things open to sight many emit bodies, some in a state of loose diffusion, like smoke which logs of oak, heat...
Page 100 - An impression which simply flows in at the pupil's eyes or ears, and in no way modifies his active life, is an impression gone to waste. It is physiologically incomplete. It leaves no fruits behind it in the way of capacity acquired. Even as mere impression, it fails to produce its proper effect upon the memory; for, to remain fully among the acquisitions of this latter faculty, it must be wrought into the whole cycle of our operations. Its motor consequences are what clinch it.
Page 146 - ... up to the geologists of our day whose data in some cases enable them to describe the material existing at a depth never yet reached by the miner — from the savage barely able to say in how many days a full moon will return, up to the astronomer who ascertains the period of revolution of a double star — there has been a gradual widening of the surrounding region throughout which the adjustment of inner to outer relations extends.
Page 111 - Everything is good as it comes from the hands of the Author of Nature; but everything degenerates in the hands of man.
Page 260 - unpractical' activities are themselves far more connected with our behavior and our adaptation to the environment than at first sight might appear. No truth, however abstract, is ever perceived, that will not probably at some time influence our earthly action. You must remember that, when I talk of action here, I mean action in the widest sense. I mean speech, I mean writing, I mean yeses and noes, and tendencies
Page 141 - The first education, then, ought to be purely negative. It consists not at all in teaching virtue or truth, but in shielding the heart from vice, and the mind from error. If you could do nothing and allow nothing to be done ; if you could bring your pupil sound and robust to the age of twelve years without his being able to distinguish his right hand from his left — from your very first lessons the eyes of his understanding would be open to reason.
Page ix - For these reasons it is an error to hold, as is sometimes held, that the mental life of adults can never be fully understood except through the analysis of the child's mind. The exact opposite is the true position to take. Since in the investigation of children and of savages, only objective symptoms are in general available, any psychological interpretation of these symptoms is possible only on the basis of mature adult introspection which has been carried out under experimental conditions.
Page 106 - The biologist, on the contrary, must never allow himself to forget that man is a part of nature and that all his works are natural works. This is specially important for the present discussion, for otherwise we are likely to forget also that man is as completely subject to the necessity of adjustment to external reality as any other organism. From the biological standpoint all the work of agriculture, of manufactures, of commerce and of government is a part of the work of consciousness to secure...

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