Genre, Reception, and Adaptation in the Twilight Series

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Ashgate Publishing, Ltd., 2012 - Literary Criticism - 236 pages
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Avoiding the reductive tendency of some recent scholarship to focus on the purported shortcomings of the 'Twilight' series with respect to literary merit and political correctness, this volume adopts a cultural studies framework to explore the range of scholarly concerns awakened by the 'Twilight' novels and their filmic adaptations. In so doing, the contributors show the series's importance for studies of popular culture, gender, reception history and young adult literature.
 

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User Review  - rivkat - LibraryThing

A mixed bag of essays about gender, audience reception (both affirmational and anti-fannish, but not much on fan creations), and the differences between books and movies. Catherine Driscoll makes the ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
Jane Eyre as Intertext for the Twilight Saga
15
2 Fantasy Subjectivity and Desire in Twilight and Its Sequels
29
Sexuality and Femininity in Stephenie Meyers Twilight Series
47
4 Narrative Intimacy and the Question of Control in the Twilight Saga
65
Race in the Twilight Saga
79
6 Girl Culture and the Twilight Franchise
95
Resisting and Repurposing Negative Fan Stereotypes
113
Narrative Closure and the Death Drive in Stephenie Meyers Twilight Series
131
Why Twilights AntiFans Cannot Stop Reading a Series They Love to Hate
147
The Complicated Terrain of Online Twilight Audience Communities
163
Uses and the Decline of Voiceover in the Twilight Films
181
Adapting Stephenie Meyers Twilight New Moon and Eclipse to Film
199
The Case of the Twilight Saga in Korea
215
Index
229
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About the author (2012)

Morey is assistant professor of English and performance studies at Texas A&M University.

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