Gensis Or Details of the Late Austrian Revolution

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Page xiii - ... scions of noble houses. They awoke to the consciousness of their own instinctive soldiership. They at once acquired confidence in themselves and in each other ; and that confidence soon grew into a spirit of unbounded audacity and ambition. " From the cannonade of Valmy may be dated the commencement of that career of victory which carried their armies to Vienna and the Kremlin...
Page xxviii - ... and two hundred of his men down the precipices; and here ended his extraordinary march, which had cost him the whole of his artillery, almost all his horses, and a third of his men. The archduke had, meanwhile, tarried on the Rhine, where he had taken Philippsburg and Mannheim, but had been unable to prevent the defeat of the English expedition under the duke of York by General Brune at Bergen, on the 19th of September. The archduke now, for the first time, made a retrograde movement, and approached...
Page xcix - Britannic Majesty and the Government of Nicaragua have consented to submit to our arbitration the question in dispute between them of the interpretation of certain articles of the treaty of Managua...
Page xiii - French nation declares that it will treat as enemies the people who, refusing or renouncing liberty and equality, are desirous of preserving their prince and privileged castes, or of entering into an accommodation with them.
Page xcv - Imperialists, drove them out of Fischamend and Albern, carried Mannsworth by storm, and pushed on toward Vienna, whilst Jellachich and Auersperg awaited their approach in most secure and advantageous positions. The main body of the Hungarians was between the Danube and the Schwartzen Lachen, a sluggish arm of that river, as broad and deep as the Danube itself. At the head of this body of water the Austrians, with a park of sixty guns, stood ready to receive them ; while ten regiments, principally...
Page liv - The sovereigns recognise as the fundamental principle of the high compact now existing between them the unalterable resolution, neither in their own reciprocal concerns, nor in their relations with other powers, to depart from the strictest obedience to the maxims of popular right ; because the constant application of these maxims to a permanent state of peace affords the only effectual guarantee for the independence of each separate power, and the security of the whole confederation.
Page cxv - Hungary—further, by compassing the destruction of the independence of the country by arms, and by calling in the disciplined army of a foreign power, for the purpose of annihilating its nationality, by violation both of the Pragmatic Sanction and of treaties concluded between Austria and Hungary, on which the alliance between the two countries...
Page xlvii - Napoleon marched in person against' Bliicher, who cautiously retired before him. Dresden being thus left uncovered, the allies changed their plan of operations, and marched straight upon the Saxon capital. But they arrived too late, Napoleon having already returned thither, after despatching Vandamme's corps to Bohemia, to seize the passes and cut off Schwartzenberg's retreat. The allies attempted to storm Dresden, on the 26th of August, but were repulsed after suffering a frightful loss. On the...
Page xxxix - January, 1809, and gave orders to concentrate his forces in Germany, and call out the full contingents of the Confederation of the Rhine. Some further time was consumed by the preparations on either side. At last, on the 8th of April, the Austrian troops crossed the frontiers at once on the Inn, in Bohemia, in the Tyrol and in Italy. The whole burthen of the war rested on Austria alone, for Prussia remained neutral, and Russia, now allied to France, was even bound to make a show at least, though...
Page lxix - Hungarians regarded the happy destinies thus apparently secured to them ; but now new difficulties arose out of those animosities of race which had been fostered by the immemorial policy of the house of Habsburg, and which the Hungarian government took no adequate pains to allay. Not one of the Croatian leaders was admitted into the ministry, or into any of the higher offices of state. This alone would have served to quench the movement which had begun in Croatia in union with that of Hungary. Austrian...

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